The vacccine against magic

The vaccine against magic

Magic and depression

by Jon Rappoport

August 16, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

“The function of the artist is to provide what life does not.” —Tom Robbins, Another Roadside Attraction

“Those people who recognize that imagination is reality’s master we call ‘sages,’ and those who act upon it, we call ‘artists.’” —Tom Robbins, Skinny Legs and All

In the human psyche, from the moment a newborn baby emerges into the light of day, he/she has a desire for magic.

We are told this is an early fetish that fades away as the experience of the world sets in. As maturity evolves. As practical reality is better understood.

In most areas of psychology, sensible adjustment to practical reality is a great prize to be won by the patient. It marks the passage from child to adult. It is hailed as a therapeutic triumph.

In truth, the desire for magic never goes away, and the longer it is buried, the greater the price a person pays.

A vaccine against a disease can mask the visible signs of that disease, but under the surface, the immune system may be carrying on a low-level chronic war against toxic elements of the vaccine. And the effects of the war can manifest in odd forms.

So it is with the inoculation of reality aimed at suppressing magic.

One of the byproducts of the “reality shot” is depression.

The person feels cut off from the very feeling and urge he once considered a hallmark of life. Therefore, chronic sadness. Of course, one explains that sadness in a variety of ways, none of which gets to the heart of the matter.

It is assumed that so-called primitive cultures placed magic front and center simply because “they couldn’t do better.” They didn’t have science, and they couldn’t formulate a “true and rational” religion with a church and monks and collection plate and a European choir and an array of pedophiles.

Their impulse for magic had to be defamed and reduced and discredited. Why? Obviously, because the Westerners who were poking through ancient cultures had already discredited magic in themselves—they had put it on a dusty shelf in a room in a cellar beyond the reach of their own memory. But they couldn’t leave it alone. They had to keep worrying it, scratching it, and so they journeyed thousands of miles to find it somewhere else—and then they scoffed at it and tried to crush it.

And we wonder why, under the banner of organized religion, there has been so much killing. At a deep level, the adherents know they’ve sold their souls and they’re depressed, angry, resentful, remorseful, and they want to assuage and expiate their guilt through violence.

But the urge for magic is forever.

And yet the charade goes on. While paying homage and lip service to ordinary practical reality seasoned with a bit of fairy-tale organized religion, people actually want to change reality, they want to reveal their latent paranormal power, they want to create realities that, by conventional standards, are deemed impossible.

They want to find and use their own magic.


Exit From the Matrix


In our modern culture, we’re taught that everything is learned as a system. That, you could say, is the underlying assumption of education. It has far-reaching consequences. It leads to the systematizing of the mind. The mind is shaped to accommodate this premise.

“If I want to know something, I have to learn it. Somebody has to teach it to me. They will teach it as a system. I will learn the system. I will elevate the very notion of systems. Everything will be a system.”

In the long run, that gets you a lump of coal in a sock, a spiritual cardboard box to live in.

The intellectual enrolls at Harvard, he studies anthropology for six years, he flies to a jungle in South America, he digs up remnants of a lost culture, he infers they performed arcane ceremonies six times a week, he writes monographs—and he concludes they were a very picturesque society with fascinating customs and totems, and their brand of magic can best be understood as an inevitable consequence of their matriarchal organization, which itself was an accommodation to rainfall levels.

Back home, the anthropologist takes two Paxil and goes off to teach a class on the meaning of ancient eyebrow trimming in Tierra Del Fuego.

Systems are wonderful things. They produce results. They take us into technological triumphs. They help us become more rational. But when they are overdone, when the mind itself becomes shaped like a system, it reaches a dead-end. Then the mind works against the unquenchable desire for magic. Then society is organized as a tighter and tighter system and turns into a madhouse.

And then people say, “Maybe machines can actually think and choose and decide. Maybe machines are alive. What would happen if we grafted computers on to our brains? It might be wonderful.”

People move in this direction after their own minds have been shaped, like putty, into systems. They don’t see much difference between themselves and machines.

When you have a world run by a million machine-systems, you encounter horrific problems. One of those problems stems from the fact that each system gets things a little bit wrong, each system is skewed to one side just a little bit—and when you add up all these little wrong bits, you get a real threat to basic survival; the whole ship of civilization is tilting dangerously in the water.

Far worse than that, the desire for magic in every individual is squelched. So the first order of business is the restoration of imagination, from which all magic flows. Imagination is sitting there, always ready, waiting.

Imagination is saying, “The mind has been shaped into a system? I can undo that. I can liberate the mind and make it into an adventurous vessel. I can provide untold amounts of new energy.”

Life is waiting for imagination to revolutionize it down to its core.

Since imagination is a wild card that technocrats can’t absorb in their systems, they pretend it a faculty produced by the action of atoms in the brain. They pretend it is a delusion that can be explained by demonstrating, for example, that a machine can turn out paintings. Or poems.

“You see? We don’t need humans to make art. Computers can do just as well. Imagination isn’t mysterious at all.”

Technocracy and transhumanism flow from the concept that the human being is just another machine. And any machine can be made to operate more efficiently. Of course, that operation must conform to overriding objectives that define what efficiency is geared for. Objectives like acceptance, surrender, group-integration.

Meanwhile, imagination waits. It never vanishes. It stands by, just in case an individual decides to live a life that overflows with creative power.


power outside the matrix


If my work has any organized precedent, it is ancient Tibet where, 1500 years ago, before the priests took over with their interminable spiritual baggage of ritual, practitioners engaged in exercises that engaged imagination to the hilt.

The entire goal was revealing that the Universe was a product of mind.

This was not about ultimate worship. This was not about some deep substrate in the Universe that one could plug into, to guide his actions and thought. It was about liberating the individual from all systems. It was about endless creation.

The first teachers of this Way came from India, where they had been pushed out of the academies of orthodox religious instruction. They were rebels. They had offloaded the metaphysical labyrinths of control. They were, in a sense, artists. Artists of reality.

They were brilliant riverboat gamblers, and in Tibet, for a time, they found a home.

They found students who, as now, were tired of the preaching designed to make humans into sophisticated mind-machines.

These people wanted more. They wanted to awaken their own imaginations and exceed the illusory boundaries of space and time.

They wanted magic.

Despite every cynical ploy, that desire is still alive.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

Are we living inside a virtual simulation?

Are we living inside a virtual simulation?

by Jon Rappoport

August 13, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

A 2013 study out of Bonn University led to a new round of speculation about the nature of the universe.

The study proposes that cosmic rays undergo a strange energy shift. The energies are “re-fitted” to align with an underlying pattern or lattice. There is only one proper fit; no exceptions are permitted.

If the lattice is, indeed, a basic pixel-like Reality we are interacting with every day of our lives, then we could be living inside a created artifice.

A simulation.

Put this description alongside the hypothesis that the universe is a hologram: lines of code inscribed on a two-dimensional surface deliver instructions on how the lattice is built, and what its properties are.

In other words, the software which holographically projects the universe includes the exact structure of the lattice.

Then, by the rules of the game, energies which don’t automatically plug into the lattice framework precisely as they’re supposed to are “snapped to” a correct fit, as Mike Adams (Natural News) has suggested.

Mike has made the analogy to a television picture, which consists of pixels that have their own dimensions and structure. So if we imagine an all-encompassing “television picture,” this would be the lattice-controlled reality we live in.

In a long-term project of putting together a collection called The Matrix Revealed, I did a great deal of research on other notions of creation or “reality-building.”

It is clear that at deep levels, propaganda turns into self-propaganda. In order to live inside a Matrix or universe, we would have to produce, in ourselves, an extraordinary level of amnesia about what we can create.

The ancient Tibetans knew a great deal about this conundrum. Before they became a theocratic society of rites and rituals and a rigorous elitism, they were daring adventurers on the edge of experiments in consciousness.

Relying on the teachings of itinerant outcast adepts from India, they developed a practice called, by a few later scholars, “deity visualization.” (See John Blofeld, The Tantric Mysticism of Tibet)

Perhaps based on an already existing mandala-painting, a teacher would give his student a very detailed and specific “personage” to create in his imagination. This effort, if it was successful at all, might take months or even years.

The objective was to mentally hold the complex image intact, in every detail, not just for a few seconds or minutes, but indefinitely. If the student was successful at this arduous task, he would soon find that the personage he created seemed to take on a life of its own.

The personage or deity would become the student’s friend and guide and give him valuable advice and counsel. When the teacher sensed this relationship had progressed to a very close point, he would order the student to get rid of the personage altogether.

This, it was said, was more difficult than the original act of creating it. But if the student was able to perform both aspects (creative and destructive) of the exercise, he would then realize, see, and know, with full consciousness, that THE UNIVERSE WAS A PRODUCT OF MIND.

At that crossroad, he would be able to spontaneously take apart pieces of “the hologram” or “the lattice,” and even create (out of nothing) new objects that hadn’t existed before.

Perhaps those Tibetan adepts, in their practice, actually saw the lattice or even the two-dimensional surface on which the holographic code of the cosmos is inscribed.

Another clue concerning the origin or underlying force that made the universe is revealed through a study of the famous alchemical diagram: two crossed staves.

The four endpoints were said to represent the basic aspects or elements of Nature: earth, air, fire, and water. According to some alchemical interpretations, these elements were in eternal conflict with one another.

The resolution of the conflict was represented by the center-place where the two staves met. This mysterious intersection was called Quintessence, and its meaning was long debated.

Paracelsus, one of the most famous of the European alchemists, seems to have thought that Quintessence was, in fact, imagination.

In other words, our creative power could change the inherent design of reality.

The history of millions of artists on this planet directly points to the fact that, when freed from restraints, human beings become enormously creative. Every painting, play, poem, novel is a world of its own; a universe. This suggests that the physical universe is but one work of art, out of a possible infinity of universes.

William Blake made several remarkable statements about the power of imagination:

“Some see nature all ridicule and deformity…and some scarce see nature at all. But to the eyes of the man of imagination, nature is imagination itself.”

“Imagination is the real and eternal world of which this vegetable universe is but a faint shadow.”

Of course, the notion of multiple universes is reflected in contemporary science. Physicist Brian Greene, author of The Hidden Reality, explains that Relativity and Quantum Theory, each highly useful in its own way, come into high mathematical conflict when set side by side.

One resolution of that conflict can be achieved through String Theory, in which tiny vibrating strings (in 10 or 11 dimensions) explain the makeup of this universe. But String Theory also suggests many surfaces or membranes or islands on which matter, energy, and time can exist: multiple universes.

No matter what force or power we say made this universe, a new day is here. We are coming to grips with the idea that the universe isn’t all the reality there is. Some find this disturbing. Others are inspired to feel it is intensely liberating.

Yet another hypothesis: we are living in an interpenetration of several simultaneous universes or planes of existence. And they’re all here now, if we could see them.

The rigorous lattice or holographic code defining this universe is merely the way one plane of existence is structured.

Rather than reduce all possible universes to the principles on which this one may be built, why not consider many, many other such “works of art?” Each universe is constructed or improvised out of the infinite well of creative freedom…


The Matrix Revealed


Could there be a greater illustration of the principle of Abundance?

Throughout history, humans have been reaching for, and elevating the idea of greater abundance. In one of the early Bible stories, Old Testament Joseph, as a boy, dreams of dancing sheaves of wheat. Wheat, grain was, for the ancients, a living symbol of abundance.

Johanna Stuckey, well-known researcher on early goddesses, points out that the Sumerian grain goddess, Ezina/Ashnan, was also called Lady of Abundance.

We have always sought, in faith, in hope, in myth, in story, in investigation the means for unending abundance. Now, we also see it reflected in our most far-reaching contemplations: not just one universe, but many universes, without end. Because if we are living in this virtual space and time, why shouldn’t other continua exist?

Are they all simulations? Is a painting a simulation? Not really. It’s an independent invention, undertaken in freedom, launched from the unfettered imagination of an artist. It is its own universe.

We are all artists.

With all veils and curtains lifted, this is the truth we have always known.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

The blockbuster movie called Reality

The blockbuster movie called Reality

by Jon Rappoport

August 3, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

There is always a certain amount of whining and remorse as one enters the theater to see the movie called Reality, after buying the ticket.

Is this a good idea?

You can already feel a merging sensation. The electromagnetic fields humming in the theater, even before the movie starts, are drawing you into the space.

Your perception of x dimensions is narrowing down to three.

You take your seat. You look at the note you’ve written to yourself, and you read it again:

“Don’t forget where you came from. Don’t forget this is just a movie. Don’t fall asleep. The serial time in the movie is an artifact. The binding feeling of sentimental sympathy is an induction. It’s the glue that holds the movie fixed in your mind.

“The movie will induce nostalgia for a past that doesn’t exist. Don’t surrender to it.

“You’re here to find out why the movie has power.

“You want to undergo the experience without being trapped in it.

“The content of the movie will distract you from the fact that it is a construct.”

The lights dim.

On the big screen, against a gray background, the large blue word REALITY slowly forms.

Suddenly, you’re looking at a huge pasture filled with flowers. The sky is a shocking blue. You can feel a breeze on your arms and face.

You think, “This is a hypnotic trance weapon.”

Now, the pasture fades away and you’re standing on an empty city street at night. It’s drizzling. You hear sirens in the distance. A disheveled beggar approaches you and holds out his trembling hand.

He waits, then moves on.

You look at the wet shining pavement and snap your fingers, to change it into a lawn. Nothing happens.

You’re shocked.

You wave your hand at a building. It doesn’t disappear.

Incredible.

You reach into your pocket and feel a wallet. You walk over to a streetlight and open it. There’s your picture on a plastic ID card. Your name is under the picture, followed by a number code. On the reverse side of the card, below a plastic strip, is a thumbprint.

There are other cards in the wallet, and a small amount of paper money. You look at the ID card again. There’s an address.

Though it seems impossible, you remember the address. You see a small cottage at the edge of an industrial town. There’s a pickup parked in the driveway.

It’s your truck. You know it. But how can that be?

You walk toward larger buildings in the distance.

Three men in uniforms turn a corner and come up to you. Behind them emerges a short man in a business suit. He nods at you and holds out his hand.

You know what he wants. You pull out your wallet and give it to him. He looks at the ID card, at you, at the card again.

“You were reported missing,” he says.

“Missing from what?” you say.

“Your home. Your job. What are doing here? Are you all right?”

“I’m fine,” you say. “I was…taking a short trip. I’m just out for some air.”

“In this part of the city? That’s not smart. We’ll take you home. Our car is right over there.”

One car sits on a side street. In large red letters printed on the trunk are the words Care and Concern.

You walk with the men to the car.

Waves you’ve never felt before are emanating from it.

Mentally, you try to back up from them. They’re targeting your body. You feel a haze settle over you.

In the haze dance little creatures. They’re speaking. You try to hear what they’re saying.

Now you do. “Reality, reality, reality.”

You look at the short man in the suit. He’s smiling at you.

Suddenly, his smile is transcendent. It’s so reassuring, tears fill your eyes.

But you’re thinking, “They built this so I would be lost, and then they found me. I’m supposed to be rescued. I’ve never experienced being rescued before. I never knew what it meant.”

You hear faint music.

It grows louder. As you near the car, you realize you’re listening to a chorus and an orchestra. The rising theme is Victory.

One of the uniformed men opens the car door.

You nod at him.

“My pleasure, sir,” he says.

The music fades away.

The scene shifts.

You’re standing next to the pickup in your driveway alongside your cottage.

You’re home.

Think, you tell yourself. What’s going on?

You recognize your mind is now divided into two parts. The first part registers sensations from this reality. Feedback. These sensations are meant to be sorted, in order to answer the question: How Am I?

The second part of your mind is entirely devoted to perceiving problems and solving them. Everything at this level is organized to constitute problems.

You were never aware of these two sectors of your mind before.

Where did they come from?

Now, as you walk into your cottage and instantly remember the rooms and the objects in these rooms, an accompanying sensation of Familiarity, slightly out of phase, grows stronger.

You realize, without knowing how, that you’re supposed to feel tremendous relief. This is what’s expected of you.

It’s expected of everyone. They live with one another through the touchstone of the Familiar. They share it like bread.

They keep coming back to it. The Familiar is a sacrament.

It’s built in. It’s invented through…electromagnetically induced fields. It’s stamped on every object in this space…

To suggest you’ve been here before. To suggest you belong here.

As you look around the cottage, you apprehend a third sector of your mind. You struggle to identify it.

It’s the fount of a different kind of perception.

Yes.

You keep staring at the cottage and you see space.

You see space that…

Has been placed here. For you.

It, too, is threaded with the Familiar.

And at that moment, there is a small explosion behind your head.

And you’re sitting in the theater again.

The movie is playing on the screen. All around you, in the seats, people are sitting with their eyes closed.

You feel a tap on your shoulder. You turn. It’s an usher.

“Sir,” he says. “Please follow me.”

He leads you up the aisle into the lobby, which is empty.

An office door opens and a young woman steps out. She strides briskly over to you.

“You woke up and came back,” she says. She gives you a tight smile. “So we’re refunding your money. It’s our policy.”

She drops a check into your hand.

“What happened in there?” you say. “What happened?”

She shrugs.

“Only you would know that. You must have done something to interrupt the transmission.”

“And the rest of those people?”

She looks at her watch. “They’re probably into their fifth year by now. The fifth year is typically a time of conflict. They rebel. Well, some of them do. They rearrange systems. They replace leaders. They promote new ideals.”

“I had such a strong feeling I’d been there before.”

She smiles. “Apparently it wasn’t strong enough. You’re back here.”

“How do you do it?”

“I’m sorry,” she says. “That’s proprietary information. Did you meet your family?”

“No,” you say. “But I was in a cottage. It was…home.”

She nods.

“If you hadn’t escaped, you would have been subjected to much stronger bioelectric bonding pulses. Do you have a family here?”

You start to answer and realize you don’t know.


Exit From the Matrix


She looks into your eyes.

“Go out to the street,” she says crisply. “Walk around. Take a nice long walk for an hour. You’ll reorient. It’ll come back to you.”

“Why do you do it?” you say.

“Do what?”

“Sell this trip.”

“Oh,” she says. “Why does a travel agent book a vacation for a client? We’re in that business.”

You turn toward the exit. The sun is shining outside. People are walking past the doors.

You take a deep breath and leave the theater.

The street is surging with crowds. The noise is thunderous.

You notice you’re carrying a rolled up sheet of paper in your hand.

You open it.

It’s a non-disclosure agreement.

“If you return from your movie experience, you agree to reveal or discuss, under penalty of law, nothing about its nature, substance, or duration…”

You look at the sheet of paper, make up your mind, and it bursts into flames.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

Film, consciousness, and mystery

Film, consciousness, and mystery

by Jon Rappoport

July 25, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

There is more mystery in two minutes of David Lynch’s Inland Empire (trailer here) than in all American films produced in the last 50 years.

The first films ever made registered like dreams with audiences, and they were made with that idea in mind. (Watch Un Chien andalou (1928), by Spanish director Luis Buñuel and artist Salvador Dalí, here.)

Mystery. A priceless commodity which has no market.

I’m not talking traditional suspense, which depends on beginning, middle, and end, and clues sprinkled on the way to a satisfying resolution. That is organized mystery, a contradiction in terms.

The opposite of organization isn’t chaos, although many people believe it is. In the hands of filmmakers like Orson Welles (The Trial, Touch of Evil), Jean Cocteau (The Blood of a Poet, Beauty and the Beast), Luis Bunuel (Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie), and David Lynch (Mulholland Drive, Inland Empire), the opposite of organization is mystery; an atmosphere.

Word, image, character, motion, rhythm, tempo—somewhere in the films another previously unknown reality takes over. There are no labels for it.

Society is not attuned to it. People dedicated to living ordinary lives hate it.

“Well, he should have started the story with the theft. Then we would have known what he was talking about. And if he’d given the wife a few extra scenes, her relationship with her son would have been obvious, and the climax would have made sense…”

Organization.

Cut things down to their essentials. Sharpen the focus. Make the audience track with the storyline. Unequivocally deliver the punchline. Sell it.

In other words, eliminate any shred of mystery.

Perhaps someday, Hollywood will be able to make a film that transmits itself in two seconds, like an injection. The sequence of imparted emotions will substitute for content. Sensation A, followed by sensations B. C, D, E, and F. Done.

“I thought it was tremendous. How about you?”

Consciousness, freed from the web of social consensus, is hungry for mystery, a fluid in which gesture, language, and motion explore and invent the impossible; what could never be lived before.

To achieve a simulacrum, a vapid imitation, audiences will sit in a theater and watch “dream-buildings” collapse (Christopher Nolan, Inception), or some kind of assembly-line time-slipping “tour de force” (Cloud Atlas, Tom Twyker, the Wachowskis).

A person committed to an ordinary life will take an occasional leap and look at Possibility in the form of popcorn surrealism.

Film was supposed to be about something else, but it became chopped steak and cars and toasters and invading machines. In the early days, a few yutzes moved out to LA from New York and became moguls of schlock. Which their PR machines sold as culture.

The improvised Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil, and The Trial aren’t even stories. No need. They’re a walking talking series of low-angle black-and-white photographs of astral locales the usual kind of film noir can merely hint at.


Exit From the Matrix


By the time David Lynch reaches Inland Empire in his career, he’s doing a ballet of gesture, each movement advancing, with gills, through a bone-muscle-flesh undersea city of corruption only he could have come upon.

Cocteau used living paintings and papier mache as his medium; human characters were driven by impulses in dreams, from which they never awakened.

For all of Stanley Kubrick’s films, it was in Barry Lyndon where, for a minute here and a minute there, the audience was finally and ecstatically delivered whole to another time; the sensuous rooms of the 18th- century Lyndon estate in England. Mystery realized.

“A film is – or should be – more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what’s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later.” (Stanley Kubrick)

“A film is a ribbon of dreams. The camera is much more than a recording apparatus; it is a medium via which messages reach us from another world that is not ours and that brings us to the heart of a great secret. Here magic begins.” (Orson Welles)

“The image it [cinema] once held for us all, that of a dream we dreamt with our eyes open, has disappeared. Is it still possible that one thousand people might group together in the dark and experience the dream that a single individual has directed?” (Federico Fellini)

“Fortunately, somewhere between chance and mystery lies imagination, the only thing that protects our freedom, despite the fact that people keep trying to reduce it or kill it off altogether.” (Luis Bunuel)

In the journey into fertile mystery, you go knowing you’ll dispense with your navigational instruments. You’ll find new stars. You’ll follow and at the same time spontaneously draw another map. This is what consciousness wants, not the tired archetypes and cartoons of other minds. And when you come back, you’ll be refreshed, whole, and able to watch, with some degree of interest, people sculpt themselves into units of a highly organized cosmos.

The true power of film has just begun to be tapped.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

Language and an exit from the Matrix

Human language and an exit from the Matrix

by Jon Rappoport

July 19, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

Can we study the history of human language as a smoothly evolving historical process?

Can we trace, from the earliest times, its incremental progress in grammar, syntax, vocabulary?

Can we say language was a kind of science, in which a whole line of “researchers built on previous gains?”

We can, if we want to tell an enormous number of lies and erase whole sectors of the planet from memory.

Otherwise, no.

Just as a very young child suddenly makes breakthroughs and quantum leaps in his ability to speak, the history of language presents cultures that deliver their languages overnight.

Within each culture, writers create major, major advances. But on the whole, the banquet of speaking and writing is there, it appears, it nourishes.

It is as if many minds in the same geo-locale tap into a field of consciousness and bring back words and patterns.

The poets and story tellers lead the way; others catch on and follow.

Language attempts, among other functions, to describe reality. But then, in a turnabout, it actively shapes and creates how reality is seen. Language limits the perception of reality.

English, with its noun-verb-object construction, is a set of arrows that fly from A to B. A is a thing or a person that acts upon B to produce an effect.

By contrast, the early Chinese pictographs present a world where relationship is more important than those separate objects that relate. The connection is the primary thing. The dynamic action implicit in the connection is the energy that underlies the culture.

As for the giant vista of ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, I believe there are still a number of mysteries to be solved. And perhaps they will remain unsolved, until we can seriously entertain the prospect of a language that simultaneously operates on several levels: “earth-talk, sky-talk, and code.”

Or as a scholar-friend once suggested, “Think of old Egyptian glyphs as a multi-dimensional CIA, headed up by an executive committee of archetypes, each of which has its own secret cryptology.”

There is no doubt that the glyphs detail a number of realms acting in concert.

What is now commonly called The Matrix involves seeing reality through the lens of one’s own language.

Through this habit, limits are formed. The idea of straying outside the boundaries seems impossible.

“What could I find? I already know What Is.”

Translation: “I already speak and write a language. It delivers reality to me. It defines how much I can see and experience.”

Take all the strategies that could propel you outside Matrix, and you can cover them with one word: imagination.

The tattered stepchild of society; the plaything of idle minds; the useless appendage; the distraction from maturity; the fairy-tale maker.

So society would have us believe.

But imagination is the motive force and the energy that instigates, invents, and multiplies realities beyond the lens of language.

Imagination is the doorway out of the Matrix.

I hope you’ll take the time to go to my site, NoMoreFakeNews.com or, click on the links to my three collections, The Matrix Revealed, Exit From the Matrix, and Power Outside The Matrix, and see what I’ve assembled, based on 25 years of research and investigation.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

Singular realities, multiple realities

Singular realities, multiple realities

by Jon Rappoport

July 9, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

“When Georges Braque and Picasso invented what came to be called Cubism, they were not only painting new hybrid objects, they were building multiple spaces and viewpoints on a single canvas. For a moment, the Singular was gone. A book or a guitar had undergone a kind of geometric alchemy that also affected space and time.” — Jon Rappoport, The Underground

I want to connect this article to my previous two (here and here) on the hoax called psychiatry.

On the ground, this is what we have. A person moves through life. He experiences some joy, some happiness, some sadness, some despair—and one day he feels he’s at a dead-end, he feels blocked, desperate.

He goes to a psychiatrist, or someone sends him to a psychiatrist, who makes a pronouncement: “You have a condition. It’s called X.”

A particular mental disorder. Of course, this ex-cathedra pronouncement has nothing to do with science, because none of the 300 officially certified mental disorders has any physical and defining diagnostic test to back it up. None.

How this patient feels (sad, despondent, up and down, weird, crazy) could be the result of many factors. Severe nutritional deficiency, environmental poisoning, horrendous home life, threats to his safety, hormone imbalances, etc.

But the psychiatrist does a clever thing. He announces a single condition and he gives it a name, a label.

He says to the patient: “This is what you have.”

It’s not, of course. The label and the condition are a fiction. As fictional as the realness of what the patient is experiencing in his life.

However, the patient now feels a little better. His severe troubles have suddenly been coalesced for him, into a name, the name of a supposed thing.

And if he asks the psychiatrist where this thing comes from, the psychiatrist will hand him another gift: “chemical imbalance in the brain.”

Aha. Yes.

Of course, this is sheer nonsense, too. No one has ever proven that mental disorders spring from some wellspring of chemical imbalances. No one has ever established a “normal chemical baseline” for the brain, against which a comparison can be made.

But no matter. Again, the patient feels relief. He has a another single thing in his hands: chemical imbalance. Right. This is why he is suffering.


Singular reality. People yearn for one. They want one. They want it as a diagnosis for their troubles, and they want it for an explanation of what happens to them after they die. They want a singular reality to define which piece of the entirely phony political spectrum they should inhabit.

In every area of life, they want a singular reality to point the way.

They want to wear a garland of flowers on a string around their necks, each flower a singular reality.

And in each case, the flower is given to them. They don’t want to experience a full-blown act of choosing.

This whole process, taken to the extreme, suggests that the world, the cosmos, the mind, perception, consciousness are tuned to singular realities that lie there, waiting to be picked up—and education is a procedure through which a student discovers what singular realities exist and which ones fit him.

Existence is vast flower shop, and under the expert guidance of the salesman, the customer buys his garland and puts it around his neck.

At this point, one might say, “Yes, but of course if this person could do some serious investigating on his own, he would discover that, behind these singular realities, there are other realities which are much deeper, which reveal far more about ‘what’s actually going on.’”

And this is certainly true. This is certainly a legitimate point.

But now, suppose we take a sharp detour. Suppose, first, we say that whether a person is dealing with superficial singular realities or deeper realities, they are each, in a significant sense, singular.

And second, perhaps there is another way to perceive. Suppose, for example, we look at Reality Y and we suddenly realize that it represents or embodies more than one thing. It embodies five things, or ten, or a hundred.

What does that mean?

It means that if you walk into the Frick Museum in New York and look at the Vermeer called Officer and Laughing Girl (c. 1657), you will see one reality on Monday and another on Tuesday, and another on Wednesday. And perhaps on Thursday, you’ll see ten or twelve “different paintings” in that one.

The single painting becomes multiple realities.

There is a whole other way of seeing, by which “the garland” of singular realities recedes into the far background.


Exit From the Matrix


In 1987, my late friend and colleague, the brilliant hypnotherapist, Jack True, told me: “If I take a patient to the point where he can see one thing in a hundred different ways, when he ‘comes back’ to this comparatively simplistic world, he finds he can deal with it far better than he could before. It’s more accessible. It‘s less problematical…”

To extend Alfred Korzybski’s famous line, “The map is not the territory,” most of the time the map is not the map. It’s a series of singular realities which are fictions.

There are certainly instances and areas in which one wants to get to the point, the conclusion, the singular reality, and assess the reasoning process (logic) by which others have arrived at that Singular.

But there are unbounded areas where perception is confounded and held in check by searching for the Singular.

Perception can open itself up and discover, with great delight, Multiples. This is called art, or more generally, imagination.

It sees “the universe in a grain of sand.” Many universes.

No civilization can endure that cuts itself off from this opening. It can only regress into singular fascism. It will always devolve into overwhelming central authority, no matter what it calls itself. And those many people who seek singular realities will accept the fascism, because they see no other possibility.

Metaphorically and literally, they want a psychiatrist (or a priest or a president) to tell them, “This is the condition of your mind. And this is what you have to do about it.”

In the multiple universes of imagination, there are no presidents.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com

What artists reveal down trough time

What artists reveal down through time

by Jon Rappoport

July 7, 2014

www.nomorefakenews.com

“You can build an unlimited number of harmonies and achieve what most people think of as perfection. But then what? You face a dead-end. So you have to keep making harmonies, over and over, and pretend you aren’t bored. This process is hypnotic and it drains away energy. You may seem to be imitating Nature’s symmetries, but suppose Nature is becoming bored, too? Suppose souls have other impulses which, if exercised, reveal forces and creations that have no names, which we loosely call Art? Suppose we are all artists waiting for something to happen—and nothing will happen, until we put brush to canvas and liberate and invent the deepest aspect of ourselves?” — Jon Rappoport, The Underground

Societies, cultures, religions, philosophies tend to believe and promote certain key ideas.

Among them: the need to imitate Nature; the preference for and worship of a notion of Harmony; and the adherence to some final metaphysical Reality.

These ideas have served useful purposes, while also sowing discord.

But artists have been delivering very different messages, which like quicksilver are more difficult to grasp—and impossible to codify.

For example: there is no need to copy Nature; the obsessive injunction toward establishing Harmony is unnecessary and confining; and there is no final metaphysical Reality.

There is, instead, an endless imagining and creating of new Realities.

Harmony is a strategy that can be employed or discarded.

The artist tells consciousness that What Already Is is always provisional.

The universe is waiting for imagination to revolutionize it down to its core. Not through some mechanistic technology, but through sheer multi-dimensional art.

These cardinal aspects of doing art delineate what is spiritual, what a spiritual path consists of.

Metaphysical content, as “spiritual information,” is a poor substitute.

In this sense, religion is frozen poetry, as if some priest class fastened on to a few dozen stanzas of a poet’s journey and iced them down into doctrine.

Art exists out past the boundaries of all reductionist ideas.

As an embracing ideal, harmony, in the long run, proves to be a false idol. At first, through balance, equilibrium, symmetry, mathematical precision, it appears to summarize and organize the deepest human dreams and hopes.

But it eventually withers, because it is a summary. It’s perfection that holds up a mirror to itself, a solipsistic skeleton.


Exit From the Matrix


One could look at the most provocative figures of Rodin and analyze them for balanced masses—but the true impact would then be lost. The force of life, the projected energy, gone.

Populations are trained like dogs to expect a climax, an opportune end to a story of existence…but an endless journey of individual creation? This has no hypnotic power. It doesn’t resonate with the fervent wish for a closed system.

Therefore, it is cast aside.

Matisse paints his red room, Van Gogh his startling irises, Lennie Tristano his tumbling effervescent rivers, Bob Graettinger his city of glass, Lenny Bruce his war of the roses against the establishment, and people draw back, resentful that their mantra of equal balance and symmetry is being interrupted.

People interpret these works as destructive—and they are. They’re destructive of an inner order of sleep, sleep which the priest class assures them is an intimation of heaven.

Consciousness intersects with politics at the deepest place, when consciousness is the artist at work—and then all political moves and manipulations and stories disintegrate like cheap advertisements.

Disintegrate like flailing crimes of a hopeless castrated caste.

Disintegrate in a sea of life being lived.

Disintegrate in the asymmetrical tides of imagination.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at www.nomorefakenews.com