A vaccine against magic

A vaccine against magic

by Jon Rappoport

December 8, 2016

“Imagination can produce a level of well-being that is bulletproof, in the sense that, no matter what happens in life, there is a back-up, there is something that can be created beyond the current crisis…” (The Magician Awakes, Jon Rappoport)

“When I use the word ‘magic’, I mean everything that can spring from imagination. Not the silly little things. The big things. The launching of entirely new realities that outdistance what society is producing. And setting a limit on what the individual can imagine and create, and how far he can go, is very much like promoting the idea that every human is ill and should be a medical patient all his life. It’s sheer propaganda that seeks the lowest common denominator, as a sales gimmick. In the case of imagination, we’re talking about the future of civilization and human life on the planet—whether it rises or falls, whether the population finally accepts the notion that every person is a victim and there is no way out…” (Notes on Exit From The Matrix, Jon Rappoport)

In the human psyche, from the moment a newborn baby emerges into the light of day, he/she has a desire for magic.

We are told this is an early fetish that fades away as the experience of the world sets in. As maturity evolves. As practical reality is better understood.

In most areas of psychology, sensible adjustment to practical reality is a great prize to be won by the patient. It marks the passage from child to adult. It is hailed as a therapeutic triumph.

In truth, the desire for magic never goes away, and the longer it is buried, the greater the price a person pays.

A vaccine against a disease can mask the visible signs of that disease, but under the surface, the immune system may be carrying on a low-level chronic war against toxic elements of the vaccine. And the effects of the war can manifest in odd forms.

So it is with an inoculation of reality aimed at suppressing magic.

One of the byproducts of the “reality shot” is depression.

The person feels cut off from the very feeling and urge he once considered a hallmark of life. Therefore, chronic sadness. Of course, one explains that sadness in a variety of ways, none of which gets to the heart of the matter.

It is assumed that so-called primitive cultures placed magic front and center simply because “they couldn’t do better.” They didn’t have science, and they couldn’t formulate a “true and rational” religion with a church and monks and collection plate and a European choir and an array of pedophiles.

Historically, the impulse for magic had to be defamed and reduced and discredited. Why? Obviously, because the Westerners who were poking through ancient cultures had already discredited magic in themselves—they had put it on a dusty shelf in a room in a cellar beyond the reach of their own memory. But they couldn’t leave it alone. They had to keep worrying it, scratching it, and so they journeyed thousands of miles to find it somewhere else—and then they scoffed at it and tried to crush it.

And we wonder why, under the banner of organized religion, there has been so much killing. At a deep level, the adherents know they’ve sold their souls and they’re depressed, angry, resentful, remorseful, and they want to assuage and expiate their guilt through violence.

But the urge for magic is forever.

And yet the charade goes on. While paying homage and lip service to ordinary practical reality seasoned with a bit of fairy-tale organized religion, people actually want to change reality, they want to reveal their latent power, they want to create realities that, by conventional standards, are deemed impossible.

They want to find and use their own magic.

In our modern culture, we’re taught that everything is learned as a system. That, you could say, is the underlying assumption of education. It has far-reaching consequences. It leads to the systematizing of the mind. The mind is shaped to accommodate this premise.

“If I want to know something, I have to learn it. Somebody has to teach it to me. They will teach it as a system. I will learn the system. I will elevate the very notion of systems. Everything will be a system.”

In the long run, that gets you a lump of coal in a sock, a spiritual cardboard box to live in.

The intellectual enrolls at Harvard, he studies anthropology for six years, he flies to a jungle in South America, he digs up remnants of a lost culture, he infers they performed arcane ceremonies six times a week, he writes monographs—and he concludes they were a very picturesque society with fascinating customs and totems, and their brand of magic can best be understood as an inevitable consequence of their matriarchal organization, which itself was an accommodation to rainfall levels.

Back home, the anthropologist takes two Paxil and goes off to teach a class on the meaning of ancient eyebrow trimming in Tierra del Fuego.

Systems are wonderful things. They produce results. They take us into technological triumphs. They help us become more rational. But when they are overdone, when the mind itself becomes shaped like a system, it reaches a dead-end. Then the mind works against the unquenchable desire for magic. Then society is organized as a tighter and tighter system and turns into a madhouse.

And then people say, “Maybe machines can actually think and choose and decide. Maybe machines are alive. What would happen if we grafted computers on to our brains? It might be wonderful.”

People move in this direction after their own minds have been shaped, like putty, into systems. They don’t see much difference between themselves and machines.

The desire for magic in every individual is squelched. So the first order of business is the restoration of imagination, from which all magic flows. Imagination is sitting there, always ready, waiting.

Imagination is saying, “The mind has been shaped into a system? I can undo that. I can liberate the mind and make it into an adventurous vessel. I can provide untold amounts of new energy.”

Life is waiting for imagination to revolutionize it down to its core.

Since imagination is a wild card that technocrats can’t absorb in their systems, they pretend it a faculty produced by the action of atoms in the brain. They pretend it is a delusion that can be explained by demonstrating, for example, that a machine can turn out paintings. Or poems.

“You see? We don’t need humans to make art. Computers can do just as well. Imagination isn’t mysterious at all.”

Technocracy and transhumanism flow from the concept that the human being is just another machine. And any machine can be made to operate more efficiently.

Meanwhile, imagination waits. It never vanishes. It stands by, just in case an individual decides to live a life that overflows with creative power.


Exit From the Matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)


If my work in this area has any organized precedent, it is ancient Tibet where, 1500 years ago, before the priests took over with their interminable spiritual baggage of ritual, practitioners engaged in exercises that engaged imagination to the hilt.

This was not about ultimate worship. This was not about some deep substrate in the Universe that one could plug into, to guide his actions and thought. It was about liberating the individual from systems. It was about endless creation.

The first teachers of this Way came from India, where they had been pushed out of the academies of orthodox religious instruction. They were rebels. They had offloaded the metaphysical labyrinths of control. They were, in a sense, artists. Artists of reality.

They were brilliant riverboat gamblers, and in Tibet, for a time, they found a home.

They found students who, as now, were tired of the preaching designed to make humans into sophisticated mind-machines.

These people wanted more. They wanted to awaken their own imaginations and exceed the illusory boundaries of one space and one time.

They wanted magic.

Despite every cynical ploy, that desire is still alive.

Here are several quotes from an introduction to my collection, Exit From The Matrix:

“Magic as a natural outcome of imagination has NOTHING to do with secret societies and their criminal operations and rituals. These secret societies are bent on imposing masters-and-slaves as their ultimate structure. That’s all they have. That’s their limit.”

“Magic is, for example, the invention of new ideas. These ideas prompt the individual to make a sharp turn and invent his future in a way that is far closer to his heart’s desire.”

“To make a literary comparison, magic is more poetry and less prose. Magic makes consciousness more alive.”

“Magic, which is ultimately imagination, lets a person know he doesn’t have a particular place where he should be. That’s a piece of nonsense and deception. ‘You have your place.’ No. ‘The universe is telling you that you have a particular place.’ When you examine that statement closely, it turns out that someone is using an idea of ‘universe’ to impose a limit and a freeze…”

“The idea that magic is ultimately imagination makes no sense to people who already have a shrunken notion of imagination. They abandoned their imagination long ago, because they couldn’t find a consensus for it. They were looking in the wrong place. They should have been looking at artists.”

“Crazy artists. Yes. The people who find it quite natural to invent realities that aren’t already existing. The people who exercise that non-crazy impulse in every field of endeavor.”

“When a person begins to realize that the new realities he can invent are much larger and more far-reaching than he previously considered, he has dipped his foot in the ocean of magic.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The Matrix of patterns

The Matrix of patterns

by Jon Rappoport

December 7, 2016

Here are quotes from two works-in-progress, The Underground and The Magician Awakes. The quotes also refer to my three collectionsThe Matrix Revealed, Exit From The Matrix, and Power Outside The Matrix:

“In a passive human, the cartels of the world become the cartels of the mind.”

“If you are nothing more than a biological machine, then what you think doesn’t matter. There is no you. This is the technocrat’s wet dream and fervent hope.”

“Intellectuals and scientists and technologists have adopted the viewpoint that, since they can see the whole of society from above, and since they can understand its workings in clearer and evermore specific terms, and since they understand the vast field of natural resources, they can and should plan and plot the future of humanity. This belief is a form of insanity.”

“If you could walk into a person’s mind, as if it were a post office, and if you could get rid of every letter and package that extolled, or surrendered to, The Group, you would see that person rise to a new height. You would see a renewal on a grand scale.”

“I’m not trying to discourage any and every group response—but I am saying, without question, that every major covert op is played in order to eradicate the idea of the individual. This is basic mind control. This is the reason mind control exists: to elevate ‘group’ over ‘individual’.”

“In Adjustment Team (1954), Philip K Dick wrote: ‘You were supposed to have been in the Sector when the [mind control] adjustment began. Because of an error you were not. You came into the Sector late — during the adjustment itself. You fled, and when you returned it was over. You saw, and you should not have seen. Instead of a witness you should have been part of the adjustment. Like the others, you should have undergone changes…something went wrong. An error occurred. And now a serious problem exists. You have seen these things. You know a great deal. And you are not coordinated with the new configuration’.”

“What I call the Reality Manufacturing Company wants everyone to have the same inner configuration.”

“Nowhere in the formulas of the Matrix is the individual protected. He is considered a wild card, a loose cannon, and he needs to be demeaned, made an outsider, and characterized as a criminal who opposes the needs of the collective.”

“Strapped by an amnesia about his own freedom and what it can truly mean, the individual opts for a place in the collective gloom. He may grumble and complain, but he fits in. But for how long?”

“A struggle continues to live. It lives in the hidden places of every individual who wants out, who wants to come back to himself, who wants to stride out on a stage. Freedom and power again. The shattering of amnesia. In this stolen world. A new stage play, titled:
The Extinct Individual Returns. In this new play, dominoes of the collective begin to fall. The stinking structure collapses, a wing here and a wing there. The vast sticky web called ‘the people’ begins to disintegrate. The pseudo-scientific plot to make humans pieces on the grand chessboard, biological machines to manipulate at will, with ‘inputs’ that ‘elicit predictable responses’—this great plan and great deception eventually becomes a burnt cinder in the annals of failed histories.”

“Someone says, ‘I want to wake up one morning and see reality in a different way, a better way.’ Then do so. Invent a new way of seeing. That’s the prescription for an artist. He creates a different way of perceiving reality. This is what he offers. This is more than a solution. It’s a revolution. It’s another universe brought into this one. Why not?”

“Repeating patterns in the mind are like organizations that keep turning out the same products. After a while, these organizations are made up of habits. To break a habit, you turn out a new product. And there no rules for this breakthrough. Imagination is the basis.”

“A person breaks through his patterns when he stops buying the products he always buys. He buys a new product. And the best product is an idea. The best idea is one that imposes no sharp boundaries. Instead, it liberates the mind. The mind can now consider options it never entertained before. The lights go on in territories that had never been explored.”

“Without thinking about it, the artist stacked half-a-dozen paintings in his studio against a wall. They overlapped. They stood side by side. Later, when he glanced at them, he was startled. They now formed one new painting. It made no conventional kind of sense. Instead, it produced the effect of seeing several universes ‘happening’ at the same time in the same place. That sensation immediately transformed what his endocrine and neurotransmitter systems were doing. Those systems were now saying to him: ‘We can handle this change. We’re up to the job.’ For the rest of the day, the painter felt his body making adjustments, as if he were preparing and tuning up for some interstellar voyage.”

“Imagination decimates restrictive human programming. With imagination, you aren’t buying a story; you’re inventing countless numbers of stories. But this invention isn’t just aimless ruminating—you create something new, you express something new, and you propel it into the world. Of course, there is fear of the New. People think something terrible might happen if they invent something new. Their friends might ridicule them. The whole universe might suddenly collapse. Their minds might shred. Whereas the truth is: you can create infinitely. AND WHAT YOU CREATE IS NEW.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The individual and his future

The individual and his future

by Jon Rappoport

December 6, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)

“It’s instructive to read what authors wrote about core values a hundred or two hundred years ago, because then you can appreciate what has happened to the culture of a nation. You can grasp the enormous influence of planned propaganda, which changes minds, builds new consensus, and exiles certain disruptive thinkers to the margins of society. You can see what has been painted over, with great intent, in order to promote tyranny that proclaims a greater good for all.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Here I present several statements about the individual, written in 19th century America. The authors, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and James Fenimore Cooper were prominent figures. Emerson, in his time, was the most famous.

“All greatness of character is dependent on individuality. The man who has no other existence than that which he partakes in common with all around him, will never have any other than an existence of mediocrity.” James Fenimore Cooper

“The less government we have, the better, — the fewer laws, and the less confided power. The antidote to this abuse of [by] formal Government, is, the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

“The former generations…sacrificed uniformly the citizen to the State. The modern mind believed that the nation existed for the individual, for the guardianship and education of every man. This idea, roughly written in revolutions and national movements, in the mind of the philosopher had far more precision; the individual is the world.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.” Henry David Thoreau

“They [conformists] think society wiser than their soul, and know not that one soul, and their soul, is wiser than the whole world…Society everywhere is in conspiracy against the manhood of every one of its members….Whoso would be a man, must be a nonconformist…. Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Can you imagine, today, any of these statements gaining traction in the public mind, much less the mainstream media?

Immediately, there would be virulent pushback, on the grounds that unfettered individualism equals brutal greed, equals (hated) capitalism, equals inhumane indifference to the plight of the less fortunate, equals callous disregard for the needs of the group.

The 19th-century men who wrote those assertions would be viewed with hostile suspicion, as potential criminals, as potential “anti-government” outliers who should go on a list. They might have terrorist tendencies.

Contemporary analysis of the individual goes much further than this.

Case in point: Peter Collero, of the department of sociology, Western Oregon University, has written a book titled: The Myth of Individualism: How Social Forces Shape Our Lives:

“Most people today believe that an individual is a person with an independent and distinct identification. This, however, is a myth.”

Callero is claiming there aren’t individuals to begin with. They’re a group.

This downgrading of the individual human spirit is remarkable, but it is not the exception. There are many, many people today who would agree (without comprehending what they are talking about) that the individual does not exist. They would agree because, to take the opposite position would set them on a path toward admitting that each individual has independent power—and thus they would violate a sacred proscription of political correctness.

These are the extreme conformists Emerson was referring to a century and a half ago.

Unable to partake in anything resembling clear thought, such people salute the flag of the Collective, blithely assuming it means “whatever is best for everyone.” Such questions as “who defines ‘best’” and “who engineers this outcome” are beyond their capacity to consider. They rest their proud case in vagueness.

Without realizing it, they are tools of a program. They’re foot soldiers in a ceaseless campaign to promote collectivism (dictatorship from the top) under the guise of equality.


Exit From the Matrix


Let me repeat one of Emerson’s statements: “The antidote to this abuse of [by] formal Government, is, the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual.” The corollary: If there is no widespread growth of individuals and their independent thoughts, actions, and moral consciousness, if they don’t widen their horizons and spheres of influence, then in the long run what check is there on government?

Demeaning the individual is, in fact, an intentional operation designed to keep government power intact and expand its range.

Consider this question: If all opposition to overbearing, intrusive, and illegitimate government were contained in organized groups, and if there were no independent “Emersonian” individuals, what would be the outcome?

In the long term, those groups would stagnate and fail in their missions. They would be co-opted by government. Eventually, all such groups would be viewed as “special needs” cases, requiring “intervention” to “help them.”

That is a future without promise, without reason, without imagination, without life-force.

That is why the individual remains vital; above, beyond, and through any blizzard of propaganda.

“Art is individualism, and individualism is a disturbing and disintegrating force. There lies its immense value. For what it seeks is to disturb monotony of type, slavery of custom, tyranny of habit, and the reduction of man to the level of a machine.” Oscar Wilde. The Soul of Man under Socialism (1891)

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Galactic control, science fiction, and the individual

Galactic control, science fiction, and the individual

by Jon Rappoport

November 30, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)

I cannot tell you how many times I have seen individuals achieve success through their own efforts, their own determination, their own commitment, their own intelligence, their own creative power—only to turn around and say:

“From my new position, my new point of view, I see what all of us together should do to usher in a better world…”

And in that superficially agreeable statement, they are implicitly denying the right to other individuals to achieve their own success.

They are slamming the door shut.

They are—having climbed the mountain—denying the mountain to others.

And with that brief introduction, here we go—

“Try looking at the world as a giant three-volume science fiction novel. Organizations of stupefying complexity rule the scene. There is an upside to this. You can gain a much deeper understanding of the archetype of the Rebel against the system.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

“What’s that you said? ‘We gave away our power?’ We? What ‘we’ is that? Did I miss a big meeting in the desert where we all got together and gave it away? Who are you anyway? A PR man for the Syndicate? There is no ‘we.’ Not until there’s an ‘I.’ Didn’t you learn that in Depro 101? Search this man. He’s either a dupe or an agent.” (Colossus Fortune, Jon Rappoport)

I’ve been chipping away and drilling the rock of Globalism for some years now.

Medically caused death and destruction. Toxic drugs. Toxic vaccines. Genetically modified food plants and their poisonous pesticides. International trade treaties. Manufactured unemployment. The pseudoscience of psychiatry. Political and media dupes. The art of group propaganda. Indoctrination and lowered IQ through education. Television mind control. Banking. Wall Street. Technocracy. And dozens more subjects.

The carrier of the Globalist world was chosen at the end of World War 2. It already existed, of course. But now it was seen as the prime instrument:

The mega-corporation.

Control of land, resources, labor. No other type of organization would be as efficient at mounting this operation.

Wars for the corporation. Population control for the corporation. Judiciaries for the corporation.

Language for the corporation. Streamlined stripped-down language for minds wedded to the corporation. Reduced minds.

And hundreds of millions, even billions of people stimulated and programmed to return to old fundamentalist religious and ethnic ideologies. If that wasn’t enough, syrupy New Age religions entered the scene.

Back far enough away from this Globalist world, and you’re looking at science fiction made real.

Philip K Dick: “Because today we live in a society in which spurious realities are manufactured by the media, by governments, by big corporations, by religious groups, political groups…So I ask, in my writing, What is real? Because unceasingly we are bombarded with pseudo-realities manufactured by very sophisticated people using very sophisticated electronic mechanisms…it is an astonishing power: that of creating whole universes, universes of the mind. I ought to know. I do the same thing.”

In this Globalist world, the individual is considered to be a cipher, a person without status or meaning. It is the mass, the group that counts.

The notion that the individual, within himself, has the power to affect the course of events seems absurd.

Yet it is exactly this juxtaposition that can give birth to extraordinary and unforeseen possibilities. The juxtaposition of: the rebel against the colossus.

The journey to discover one’s own authentic power is what is called for.

In 1974, Frank Herbert, the author of Dune, wrote this: “The current utopian ideal being touted by people as politically diverse (on the surface, but not underneath) as President Richard M. Nixon and Senator Edward M. Kennedy goes as follows — no deeds of passion allowed, no geniuses, no criminals, no imaginative creators of the new. Satisfaction may be gained only in carefully limited social interactions, in living off the great works of the past. There must be limits to any excitement. Drug yourself into a placid ‘norm.’ Moderation is the key word…”

The “utopian ideal” is sameness. It is promoted. It is propagandized. It is bought and sold. Therefore, underneath that illusion, what lives? That is the question. What exists below and behind this enormous sales pitch?

The individual and his power.

This is dormant force that, even at this late date in history, remains to be explored.

Part of that exploration is weeding out and disposing of cynical philosophical exploitations such as: “all power is evil.”

“All power=corruption.”

Power is not inherently the same thing as crime. Power is not the same thing as rule by force. Power is not the same thing as control of populations.

Not when you’re talking about the voyage of the individual as he discovers what is within himself.

I keep saying that, and I’ll keep on saying it.

See the planet as a “galactic” syndicate and you begin to see the real terms of the situation. The individual has been edged out, marginalized, co-opted into the structure whenever possible. The individual has been left in the darkness, as if he is a vestigial and extinct prop from an earlier period on the evolutionary tree.

Good. So be it.

It clarifies things.

The utopian ideal of Globalism is not only an illusion and a deception, it’s an impossibility—which is to say, all projections of a uniform society based on a group-outcome, in which we agree on an image of what we strive for…there is no freedom in that. There is no actual harmony in that. There is no passion in that.

The society to hope for and work for is an open one. And that means individuals, self-empowered, imagine and independently invent their greatest multiple futures and realities simultaneously.

And for that to happen, individuals have to discover what their own power is.

And then there can be authentic cooperation and community.

Let me put it this way. The Globalists are painting a gigantic mural, which they call Reality. They want us to look at it, be hypnotized by it, and walk into it, to take up residence there.

The notion that we can reject this mural and instead paint ONE NEW ONE together…is completely absurd.

That would be just another substitute, another version of slavery—in this case, self-imposed.

Freedom is not uniformity. It never was.

The overthrow of the machine of control eventually comes back to this: how many individuals are awake and alive to their own power, their own power to invent the future they most profoundly desire?

Why expend enormous amounts of energy if the work is superficial? Why spend years if the work is automatic and dead?

Making your work known in the world begins with knowing something about the work. It begins with knowing you have unlimited energy to give to it. That energy comes from discovering/inventing your deepest possible goals.

Then, the energy shows up in abundance.


Exit From the Matrix


But it can all go to waste without commitment. Commitment is not something that happens naturally. It doesn’t float in on a breeze. It doesn’t show up as a gift under the Xmas tree. It’s a choice. Yes or no. Every day.

Some people have doubts about whether their work is worth being known and visible in the world. Those doubts are spurious. They’re based on not having found a profound objective and purpose.

Skills and strategies can be learned. But their basis and root are in you.

Excuses for not doing what I’m alluding to here are endless. People make them up by the ton. Postponement Inc. and Distraction Inc. are always flourishing.

It’s even fashionable to be confused, and then parlay that into a solid story of irreversible victimhood. But,…

“Inspiration is outside state control.” —Kenneth Clark

“At the core of every true talent there is an awareness of the difficulties inherent in any achievement, and the confidence that by persistence and patience something worthwhile will be realized. Thus talent is a species of vigor.” —Eric Hoffer

“Don’t loaf and invite inspiration; light out after it with a club, and if you don’t get it you will nonetheless get something that looks remarkably like it.” —Jack London

“There are some people who hear the word CREATE and wake up, as if a new flashing music has begun. This lone word makes them see something majestic and untamed and astonishing. They feel the sound of a Niagara approaching. CREATE is a word that should be oceanic. It should shake and blow apart the pillars of the smug boredom of the soul. CREATE is about what the individual does when he is on fire and doesn’t care about concealing it. It’s about what the individual invents when he has thrown off the false front that is slowly strangling him. CREATE is about the end of mindless postponement. It’s about what happens when you burn up the pretty and petty little obsessions. It’s about emerging from the empty suit and empty machine of society that goes around and around and sucks away the vital bloodstream.” —The Creative Center, Jon Rappoport

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

The entrepreneur/visionary and his challenges

The entrepreneur/visionary and his challenges

by Jon Rappoport

November 15, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)

This article isn’t about tax rates and government red tape and intrusive regulations. Those issues are, of course, very real.

This is about the person who has large dreams and ambitions, and has launched them, or is on the cusp of launching them. He appears to be a dying breed in this society, but he is not. Under the surface, out of the limelight, there are many, many such people. I have worked with some of them in my consulting practice, and I admire them. They have escaped from the dependency culture. They have energy, and they move forward. They don’t set gross limits on themselves. They understand the founding ideas on which this country was built.

On one level, the share the trait of resistance. They don’t back down and opt for safe and easy solutions. They don’t bow down to the system or prevailing trends. They don’t obsessively look for excuses. Wearing a nicey-nice mask isn’t their main goal.

They deal with challenges. One, of course, is building something from the ground up. Another is building a vision into the world without scaling it back so far that it loses its unique scope, size, and power.

Entrepreneurship has a counter-intuitive core. The more the enterprise is built to the scale of the original dream, and the less it is compromised, the greater the chances of success.

This is something most people can’t fathom. They see compromise as the ultimate instrument. They deploy it whenever they can. They strive to become experts in its use. They see invention and creation as entirely dependent on the public’s “lowest common denominator.” This, to them, is the way reality works.

And on one level, they’re right. But this isn’t the level of the person with a vision. How thrilling the enterprise becomes when it is built to be everything it was meant to be—and when, lo and behold, people respond—as if they’ve been waiting for it, for a long time. Then the entrepreneur/visionary realizes how reality CAN operate. It’s a revelation. He experiences it.


Exit From the Matrix


The entrepreneur needs to inspire the people he works with. Committing to his own vision through thick and thin, he has to keep it fresh and new. Even if, at times, he feels as if he’s rolling a huge stone up a hill, he can’t let the vision merge with that stone. He has to keep the vision pure. His ace in the hole is he WANTS to keep it new and pure. His final challenge is avoiding becoming rigid as he keeps the vision secure. He has to pour an elastic and far-reaching energy into his work. He has to be able to be spontaneous—there are many times when improvisation in the moment is his best ally.

If all this seems too much—it isn’t. Deep down, the entrepreneur knows it. He is tapping into a well that is bottomless. He comes to understand this secret. There are no limits.

His imagination and creative power have no boundaries.

The entrepreneur can cross a threshold and find that his work and goals have expanded to such a degree that he has become a true visionary. What he once thought was the end of his ambition was just a stepping stone, and the path he is now walking has no end.

No end.

—Always beginning.

The architect and engineer of his dream, he can simultaneously look at what he has built so far and appreciate it, and he can also see that he is, at the start of every day, inventing anew. He is, simultaneously, a thousand miles along his path, and immersed in a great Now.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

A new teaching: Imagination

A new teaching: Imagination

by Jon Rappoport

November 14, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)

“People sometimes recognize that the content of their thoughts defines the limits of their reality; but they rarely notice that these thoughts also give rise to a SPACE that is limited and holds them in check.” (The Magician Awakes, Jon Rappoport)

I call it new because it still has not been given its proper due. Imagination is beyond “subject matter” or “content” or “knowledge” or “systems” or “philosophy” or “metaphysics.”

Imagination is not something you pursue, like a lost mine or a species of plant never seen before. Imagination is not an object.

It can solve problems. It can dispense with a problem altogether. But imagination is not a solution. It isn’t a method.

Imagination is already there in every person, as a potential. To put it in a slightly different way, imagination comes into being the moment you want it. Even more accurately, perhaps, imagination is imagining. It’s an action. When you want to take that action, you can.

What imagination invents is, of course, different from person to person. Why? Because there is no pre-set pattern. There is no “final answer” at which imagination arrives.

A painter can say, “This painting is the embodiment of everything I’ve been reaching for,” but if he think that means imagination has served its function and can then fold up and dissolve, he is mistaken.

Where does imagining happen? That’s an interesting question. Many years ago, an old acquaintance of mine told me the following amusing story: A painter of horses felt she had come to the end of the line because she wanted to paint large horses on large canvases, but she was convinced she couldn’t picture the large horses because…imagining was taking place in her brain, and her brain was small.

When she finally realized this was a major misconception, she executed a course correction and…she was painting big horses on big canvases.

Imagining doesn’t take place in the brain. As untold numbers of artists down through history have understood, imagining takes place in “a space.” That space is invented. That space is not the same space you see when you look through your window or walk down the street or stand on a roof top. You invent other spaces. You populate them with thoughts, images, sensations.

And these other spaces have no restrictions on size, shape, dimension, and so forth.

Tesla has been quoted as saying that he would envision an entire machine before he built it, and in that imagining he could view all the parts of the machine operating together—and therefore he already knew whether the device would work properly, before he assembled a single component.

Do you think he was seeing the machine inside one of his own brain cells, or inside a cluster of cells? That’s quite a joke. Of course not. He was seeing the machine sitting there in a space—and he was imagining both the machine and the space.

The literature called science fiction took off, in part, because the reader was imagining all sorts of wondrous spaces populated by many strange and fascinating creatures and civilizations. Huge spaces.

In other words, there is physical space, the common arena we share…and there are an infinity of possible other spaces a person can imagine.

What a person imagines, in the way of spaces, need not be “scientific” or “clinical” or “according to the laws of physics.” There are no restrictions.

I once spoke with a woman who had, for many years, struggled to win a victory in a just environmental cause. She was a veteran activist leader; and she had never won what she was seeking. She was stymied. I told her she had to imagine a new kind of strategy, and I gave her a writing exercise that might enable her to get outside all the familiar campaigns of the past. Within two minutes, she found what she was looking for. Which is to say, she imagined it.

I wasn’t giving her knowledge or content or a system or an answer. I was showing her a way to invent something new, on her own.

Not long after our conversation, I finished work on my second collection, Exit From The Matrix. The heart and core of that work is a series of imagination exercises that, practiced in a daily fashion, can transform a person’s view of reality and their own power.


Exit From the Matrix


The word “education” comes from two Latin roots: “ducere,” meaning to lead, and “e,” the prefix meaning “out of” or “from.” Education, in that sense, is leading something out of the person, something that was already there.

Imagination, with all its awesome possibilities, is already there in a person. The “teaching” part involves bringing out that innate capacity so that it becomes conscious.

The bottom line: when all the imagining a person does is happening subconsciously, he’s trapped in a machine-like habit.

He becomes glued to the repetitious content and the sameness of what he keeps imagining over and over—and it becomes his chronic reality.

Conversely, when the person imagines and creates consciously, he becomes aware of his power and its immense latitude, and his freedom.

This makes all the difference.

Because, consciously, he can imagine and invent the future he truly desires.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

There is a lot of static and interference out there now

There is a lot of static and interference out there now

by Jon Rappoport

November 13, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Exit From The Matrix, click here.)

The tsunami of election news and fallout has created much confusion out there. People are exhausted; they’re running and hiding; their uncertainty is spiking; their cynicism is kicking into high gear; they’re trying, in some cases, to dumb themselves down…

This always happens when a large event is resolved in favor of one side, but doubts remain about the winner. It’s as if the lights in the stadium went out during the last quarter of the Super Bowl. What happened? What’s happening now? What will happen?

People are even forgetting they have lives of their own. And that’s what I want to return to. Because, when individuals park their own lives, they’re bound to experience disorientation.

General issues raised in the presidential campaign have stimulated questions that individuals ask themselves: do I want to be free? How free? Do I want to take control over my own destiny? What are my true goals? Where am I going?

These and other similar questions are, of course, quite valid. And yes, answering them can cause an upheaval.

And the life of the individual is paramount. What difference does the course of the nation make, if the individual loses his way, if most individuals lose their way? After all, this nation was founded on the basis of liberation of the individual.

I suggest that the disparity between where a person is headed and where he REALLY wants to go is at the core of the confusion he may be feeling. This disparity has arisen time and time again in my consulting work with private clients.

It doesn’t resolve by turning away and ignoring the gap. It doesn’t resolve by pretending the situation isn’t real.

The presidential campaign featured two candidates who had very different visions for the future of America. Those differences caused many people—if only at a subconscious level—to question their own vision for their own future.

What’s the compromised vision? What’s the real one?

What’s the vision that would get me out of bed in the morning ready to go, filled with energy and excitement and optimism?

When a person sacrifices THAT, he’s operating from a severe deficit. He’s filling in blanks in his life with rationalizations.


Exit From the Matrix


The notion of serious contemplation has become foreign in this society. But serious contemplation is exactly what is needed, if the individual is to change course and move in the direction he really wants to pursue.

This is not a side issue. This is a central issue. This is the big one.

Understanding that fact alone can restore equilibrium. And then, self-engagement in discovering what the best personal vision is becomes the next adventure.

No amount of static and interference floating in the air these days justifies backing away from that adventure.

The life of the individual is paramount.

The founding principles of this nation were engraved to emphasize it.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.