Exit From Old Mind: Notes from The Underground

Exit From Old Mind: Notes from The Underground

by Jon Rappoport

February 21, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

Here are notes from my work-in-progress, The Underground. They come from the 2008-10 period, as I was preparing my collection, Exit From The Matrix, with its dozens of techniques that engage the imagination with new space, energy, and time:

“Old repetitive thoughts mean old repetitive space, because thoughts occur in space. Carrying forward old space results in the depletion of energy. The alive energy of the mind is always looking for new space.”

“Mind control is a method of installing old space and keeping it in place. It has the effect of standing in a museum and looking at one panting, a painting you don’t even admire.”

“The creative mind has the potential of a limitless number of new spaces.”

“Many people are thrilled when they discover that a million people thinking the same thought can produce changes in energy fields, in the distribution of matter. But this is simply the way things work. Much more thrilling is the effect of one individual creating a new reality. Collective thought and creation, in the long run, dampen the individual life-force. This is something most people don’t want to know about. They just want one collective matrix to replace another.”

“Traditional organized religions are all about defining states of mind and trying to impose them. The modern version of this is psychiatry. The more distance you achieve from psychiatry, the more obvious it becomes that this is merely another system of map-making, the objective of which is control.”

“The individual creative impulse is not fixated on a laundry list of outcomes. The creative impulse is the horse let out of the barn. It’s free, open, wide-ranging. The energies that are then released are spontaneous. They aren’t the product of society or the collective.”

“All civilizations eventually become a series of interlocking systems. The individual isn’t an interlocking system.”


Exit From the Matrix


“What most people really think of when they think about Tibet is the culture after a theocracy took over. The hidden history of that country, the early history, had no ruling priesthood. Students and teachers were devoted to discovering the power of imagination. They had no ruling cosmology. They had a profound desire to become individual artists of reality. Inventors of reality in the widest possible way. They weren’t spiritual collectivists.”

“Today, in spiritual movements, in academia, in politics, we see a fierce and growing dedication to a rigged spiritual collectivism, a collective cosmology. This is propaganda mind control. It flourishes among those who have given up on the idea of the individual.”

“The paranormal? Telepathy, seeing into the future, so-called remote viewing, telekinesis? These experiences and capabilities come out of individual imagination. They don’t occur because ‘everything is connected to everything.’ The universe doesn’t give the imagination permission to exist and operate.”

“So-called spiritual values are upside down. They give the group primacy over the individual. They instill individual limitation. They build a fictional picture of the universe, which they then use to derive what the individual can do. They put the last thing first.”

“My self-appointed job is clearing all the tons and mountains and rotting jungles of garbage away from the individual imagination—and then saying, there, there it is: imagination, creative power, life-force. It’s yours. Here are ways you can exercise it, expand it, move with it in unlimited directions of your own choosing. It’s YOU. It’s not the State or the Group or any organization or system. It’s you.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Stravinsky, Dali and the revolution of imagination

Stravinsky, Dali, and the revolution of imagination

by Jon Rappoport

February 7, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

On May 29, 1913, in the Theatre des Champs-Elysees in Paris, a riot broke out.

After the curtain went up on the premiere of The Rite of Spring, it took only a few minutes for the tumult to begin.

Boos, hisses, catcalls, people throwing objects at the stage… The roar of the crowd quickly became so loud, the dancers lost their cues.

And the music. It was a whisper, a pounding scream, sheets of brass, harsh relentless rhythms breaking against one another, cliffs suddenly colliding and collapsing in the air.

The police arrived and shut the program down.

Stravinsky, at 28, had arrived on the world scene.

Never again would he compose music so challenging. Later in his life, after he had taken up a position as a champion of new classicism, he would conduct a recording of the Rite that was modulated to a bare shadow of its former self.

But the revolution had happened.

Much has been written about the premiere and the Rite. A great deal of programmatic explanation has been offered to “make sense” out of the piece of music: after all, it was a ballet with a plot, and the themes had to do with primitive ritual sacrifices in a fanciful pagan world.

You can also find scholarly work on the structure of the Rite, indicating a possible borrowed background of several Eastern European folk melodies.

Formidable creations of imagination are often diluted by referring the audience to other works and periods of time and influences—to explain the incomprehensible.

But the fact is, to absorb a work of imagination, one has to use his own imagination.

Since this is considered unlikely, pundits earnestly help us with step-down contexts, so that we can understand the work in pedestrian terms. In other words, so we can reduce it to nothing.

Fundamentally, it is its own world. It immediately and finally presents itself as a universe apart from easy references and tie-ins and links.

So when you listen to the Rite, you are, gratefully, alone with the music. In this regard, I recommend one recording. The 1958 Leonard Bernstein-New York Philharmonic, available as Sony SMK 47629. It’s the 1992 Bernstein Royal Edition. Le Sacre Du Printemps.

Bernstein, one of the geniuses of the 20th century, was no stranger to encountering imagination with imagination. And yet, as the conductor, he had no need to distort the score. If anything, he was more faithful to it and the composer’s great intent than any other conductor, past or present.

In 1912 and 1913, Stravinsky had composed the Rite in a reckless frame of mind. This did not mean he abandoned all he knew; it meant he wanted to show everyone how dim the perception of music had become. “To hell with all of them.”

He took the large orchestra and shredded the conventional relationships between its various sections. Instead, he made it an ocean in a storm. He crossed all lines. He crashed together old sounds and new sounds. He destroyed pleasant mesmerizing rhythms.

But there was nothing primitive about his undertaking. He made something new, something no one could have predicted.

As you listen to it, you may find one part of your mind repeating, this is not music, this is not music. Just keep listening. Five times, 50 times, 100 times.

There are artists like Stravinsky, like the Spanish architect Gaudi, like Edgar Varese, like the often-reviled American writer Henry Miller, like Walt Whitman (although Whitman has been grotesquely co-opted into a Norman Rockwell-like prefect), like the several great Mexican muralists—all of whom transmit an oceanic quality.

As in, The Flood.

There is a fear that, if such artists were unleashed to produce their work on a grand scale—and if the societal chains of perception were removed—they would take over the world.

This is the real reason there was a riot at the Theatre des Champs Elysees on May 29, 1913. Even though Stravinsky was presenting a universe of his own making, people instinctively felt that the music could spill over into the streets of Paris…and after that, where would it go? What would stop it?

Their fear was justified.

Our world, contrary to all consensus, is meant to be revolutionized by art, by imagination, right down to its core.

That this has not happened for the best is no sign that the process is irrelevant. It is only a testament to the collective resistance.

Who knows how many such revolutions have been shunted aside and rejected, in favor of the shape we now think of as central and eternal?

We are living in a default structure, the one that has been left over after all the prior revolutions have been put to sleep.

And still, it takes imagination and creating to give us what we have now. But often it is a harnessed imagination that accedes to a stolid esthetic that replaces daring and vast improvisation with classical forms and formats, long after their time.

We peek between the fluted columns to see what the future might hold. We speculate, for example, that information itself might be alive and might flow in from our own DNA to bring about a new cyber-brain step in evolution. Information? What further evidence do we need that our society is heading down a slope to the swamp?

If Rite of Spring and other works of that magnitude are information, a wooden duck on a doily is Shakespeare.

Mere information is the wood scrapings and the stone chips Brancusi swept up in his studio and put out in the alley. Information is the dried flattened tubes of paint Matisse disposed of with the old newspapers. Information is the heap of wires Tesla tossed in the garbage.

Information is the neutral boil-down left over after the artist has made his mark.

Creation is not neutral.

It flows out into the atmosphere with all its subjective force.

That is what happened on May 29, 1913.

And that is what evoked the mass fear.


Exit From the Matrix


The critics would have declared Salvador Dali a lunatic if he hadn’t had such formidable classical painting skills.

He placed his repeating images (the notorious melting watch, the face and body of his wife, the ornate and fierce skeletal structures of unknown creatures) on the canvas as if they had as much right to be there as any familiar object.

This was quite troubling to many people. If an immense jawbone that was also a rib or a forked femur could rival a perfectly rendered lamp or couch or book (on the same canvas), where were all the accoutrements and assurances of modern comfortable living?

Where was the pleasantly mesmerizing effect of a predictable existence?

Where was a protective class structure that depended on nothing more than money and cultural slogans?

Dali invented vast comedies on canvas. But the overall joke turned, as the viewer’s eye moved, into a nightmare, into an entrancing interlude of music, a memory of something that had never happened, a gang of genies coming out of corked bottles. A bewildering mix of attitudes sprang out from the paintings.

What was the man doing? Was he making fun of the audience? Was he simply showing off? Was he inventing waking dreams? Was he, God forbid, actually imagining something entirely new that resisted classification?

Words failed viewers and critics and colleagues and enemies.

But they didn’t fail Dali. He took every occasion to explain his work. However, his explications were handed out in a way that made it plain he was telling tall tales—interesting, hilarious, and preposterous tall tales.

Every interview and press conference he gave, gave birth to more attacks on him. Was he inviting scorn? Was he really above it all? Was he toying with the press like some perverse Olympian?

Critics flocked to make him persona non grata, but what was the persona they were exiling? They had no idea then, and they have no idea now.

It comes back to this: when you invent something truly novel, you know that you are going to stir the forces trapped within others that aspire to do the very same thing. You know that others are going to begin by denying that anything truly NEW even exists. That DOES make it a comedy, whether you want to admit it or not.

It is possible that every statement ever uttered in public by Dali was a lie. A fabrication. An invention dedicated to constructing a massive (and contradictory) persona.

Commentators who try to take on Dali’s life usually center on the early death of his young brother as the core explanation for Dali’s “basic confusion”—which resulted in his bizarre approach to his own fame.

However, these days, with good reason, we might more correctly say that Dali was playing the media game on his own terms, after realizing that no reporter wanted the real Dali (whatever that might mean)—some fiction was being asked for, and the artist was merely being accommodating.

He was creating a self that matched his paintings.

It is generally acknowledged that no artist of the 20th century was superior to Dali in the ability to render realistic detail.

But of course Dali’s work was not about realism.

The most complex paintings—see, for example, Christopher Columbus Discovering America and The Hallucinogenic Toreador—brilliantly orchestrated the interpenetration of various solidities/ realities, more or less occupying the same space.

I’m sure that if Dali were living today, he would execute a brain-bending UFO landing on the front lawn of the White House. Such a painting would envelop the viewer with simultaneous dimensions colliding outside the president’s mansion.

At some point in his career, Dali saw (decided) there was no limit to what he could assemble in the same space—and there was no limit to the number of spaces he could corral into the same canvas. A painting could become a science-fiction novel reaching into several pasts and futures. The protagonist (the viewer) could find himself in such a simultaneity.

Critics have attacked the paintings relentlessly. They are offended at Dali’s skill, which matches the best work of the meticulous Dutch Renaissance masters.

They hate the dissonance. They resent Dali’s mordant wit and rankle at the idea that Dali could carry out monstrous jokes in such fierce extended detail.

But above all, the sheer imagination harpoons the critics. How dare a painter turn reality upside down so blatantly, while rubbing their faces in it.

The cherry on the cake was: for every attack the critics launched at Dali the man (they really had no idea who he was), Dali would come back at them with yet another elaborate piece of fiction about himself. It was unfair. The scholars were “devoted to the truth.” The painter was free to invent himself over and over as many times as he fancied.

Dali was holding up a mirror. He was saying, “You people are like me. We’re all doing fiction. I’m much better at it. In the process, I get at a much deeper truth.”

Dali was the hallucinogenic toreador. He was holding off and skirting the charges of the critics and the historians. They rushed at him. He moved with his cape—and danced out of the way.

The principles of organized society dictate that a person must be who he is, even if that is a cartoon of a cartoon. A person must be one recognizable caricature forever, must be IDed, must have one basic function. Must—as a civilization goes down the trail of decline—be watched and recorded and profiled.

When a person shows up who is many different things, who can invent himself at the drop of hat, who seems to stand in 14 different places at the same time, the Order trembles.

(Fake) reality declares: what you said yesterday must synchronize absolutely with what you say today.

This rule (“being the only thing you are”) guarantees that human beings will resonate with the premise that we all live and think and work in one continuum of space and time. One. Only one. Forever. The biggest joke of all. The big lie.

Whatever he was, however despicable he may have been in certain respects, Dali broke that egg. Broke the cardinal rule.

He reveled in doing it. He made people wait for an answer about himself, and the answer never came. Instead, he gave them a hundred answers, improvised like odd-shaped and meticulous reveries.

He threw people back on their own resources, and those resources proved to be severely limited.

How harsh for conventional critics to discover that nothing in Dali’s education produced an explanation for his ability to render an object so perfectly on the canvas. It was almost as if, deciding that he would present competing circumstances inside one painting, he perversely ENABLED himself to do the job with such exacting skill, “making subversive photographs come to life.”

That was too much.

But there the paintings are.

Imagination realized.

Like it or not, Dali paved the way for many others. He opened doors and windows.

And the pressure has been building. The growing failure of major institutions (organized religion, psychology, education, government) to keep the cork in the bottle signals the prison break in progress.

More people understand that the veil is not really a veil of tears. It’s a curtain madly drawn across the creative force.

The pot is boiling. People want out.

Somewhere along the line we have to give the green light to our own creative power. That is the first great day. That’s the dawn of no coerced boundaries. Everything we’ve been taught tells us that a life lived entirely from creative power is impossible. We don’t have it within us. We should maintain silence and propriety in the face of greater official power and wisdom. We must abide by the rules. We must, at best, “surrender to the universe.”

But what if, when we come around the far turn, we see that the universe is us? Is simply one part of imagination? Is a twinkling rendition we installed to keep us titillated with dreams that would forever drift out of reach? What if it turns out that we are the perverse ones and Dali is quite normal?

What if we pop out of the fences of this culture and this continuum and this tired movie called planet Earth?

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Imagination is the key, Part2

Imagination is the key, Part 2

by Jon Rappoport

February 6, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

“Imagination isn’t just a toy for children. It’s the vital lifeblood of human action that goes beyond the mechanical.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

By the dawn of the 20th century, it was clear that humans had finally liberated themselves from the overwhelming need to build myths.

By myths, I mean fanciful stories parading as truth. I mean stories that placed the individual as a small creature under the control of inexorable forces.

There was no longer a need to invent such stories, which were self-sabotaging.

There was no longer a need to invent the stories and then claim the stories hadn’t been invented at all.

To put it another way, humans could see their own imaginations were paramount—and they could create and invent in many directions.

This immense breakthrough was the result of centuries of struggle.

But, as it turned out, the old adage proved true: you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

Many, many, many people stepped back from the breakthrough. They retreated. They looked for old myths they could align themselves with and even worship. They went tribal. They sought “a revival of the past.”

They chose not to be what they were and are: artists. I use that word in the broadest sense. I’m talking about individuals who create new realities, new futures.

I’m talking about open, free, and unlimited human imagination—and the stunning amount of energy that is liberated when the individual makes his imagination the prow of his own ship.

Many people are content to view imagination as child’s play in a sandbox, a brief time of joy that needed to be offloaded in “maturity.”

The result? A sense of pervasive limitation. A focus on the mechanical and the repetitive. A dampening of the emotions. A reluctance to explore what lies beyond what is already known.

In other words, a lessening of life-force.


Exit From the Matrix


But imagination doesn’t go away and die. It never dies. It is always there, waiting. It can be tapped into and awakened at any moment.

And when it is awakened and deployed, it outdistances all negatives, all despairs, all mechanical neutralities. They melt down into the energy from which they originally came and become raw fuel for the fire of individual creation.

This fact of life needs no external cosmology to justify itself, no “universe” to grant permission to the individual, no beneficent force to provide an explanation. That metaphysical baggage (more myth-making) was the past.

Within the individual are all the faculties and eternalities. They were always there. They will always be there.

The magic is always there.

It sees “realism” and “it is what it is” and conventional psychology and philosophic materialism as a spectacular joke.

The magic has always been imagination.

Immortal.

JJon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Imagination is the key

Imagination is the key

by Jon Rappoport

February 2, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

“Your past, everything that has ever happened to you, everything you’ve ever done becomes raw fuel for the fire of your imagination. That is the meaning of transformation. The past is no longer a problem. You invent futures that are no longer limited by the past.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Let’s say you live in a three-story house…but in all the years you’ve lived there, you’ve never gone upstairs to the second and third floors. You’ve spent the entire time on the first floor.

On the first floor, you’ve grappled with problems, made your stand, dealt with crises, planned your solutions.

Occasionally, you’ve had glimpses of something more, but that’s it. Glimpses.

The upper unused floors are imagination.

That’s where problems are transformed, where possibilities become so real they outdistance the normal terms in which problems are cast and thought about.

In truth, a whole new life is there for the taking, on the upper floors. An invented life.

One night at 4am, you wake up and realize those upper floors are yours. You go up the stairs. You look around and you see your own past, your own history—but now, all that material contains an added potential.

The potential to be recast, remixed, combined, dissolved, reshaped…or eliminated entirely. You see pure possibility stretching out in all directions. Waiting.

Waiting for you to invent.

The space of those upper floors can be changed. It can be expanded without limit.


Exit From the Matrix


It’s not the content of the future you’re seeing. It’s the possibility of inventing content.

This possibility is so pure, so alive, it overshadows questions and confusions.

You’re the painter with the blank canvas. The thrill of that fact goes beyond any adventure you’ve ever had.

The only question is, do you want this? Will you choose it?

No one can answer that question except you. But you can realize that, down through history, others have said yes. Others have launched themselves. Others have discovered that, as they moved on that road, their bedrock emotions underwent a transformation and their perception of life changed…

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Power beyond mind control

Power beyond mind control

by Jon Rappoport

January 14, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

“All thought is not the same. There is random static. There is repetitious and circular rumination. There is thought devoted to solving a problem or analyzing a situation. There is thought that occurs when one is creating something that never existed before. To blithely say that ‘externally inserted’ mind control can replace all levels of thinking without a person being aware of what is going on is foolish.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Consciousness wants to create new consciousness, and it can. Imagination is how it does it. If there were some ultimate state of consciousness, imagination would always be able to play another card and take it further.

In any arena of life, and especially when it comes to mind, perception, power, empathy, and so on, there is always a status quo. It’s merely the place where a person says, “Well, that’s enough. I’ll settle for what I have. I’ll stop here.”

Sooner or later, this leads to boredom, frustration, problems, and conflict. It leads to a decline.

Imagination, which knows no bounds, is the source for the most adventurous explorations. It can have great impact on the material world, of course, but one mustn’t therefore conclude it is composed of matter or energy. Imagination is non-material. To think otherwise winds you up in using some version of physics to depict imagination—and then you are imposing limits on it. This is an error. Imagination doesn’t obey any laws of physics.

If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, we’ve flattered reality enough. It doesn’t need any more. Imagination creates new realities.

You can create the same thing over and over, and eventually you’ll be about as alive as a table. Inject imagination into the mix, and everything suddenly changes. You can steer that boat anywhere you want to.

The lowest common denominator of consensus implies an absence of imagination. Everyone agrees; everyone is bored; everyone is obedient. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there are massive floods of unique individual creation, and then that sought-after thing called abundance is as natural as the sun rising in the morning.

Sitting around in a cosmic bus station waiting for reality is what reality is. Everything else is imagination.


Exit From the Matrix


There are those who believe life is a museum. You walk through the rooms, find one painting, stroll into it and take up permanent residence. But the museum is endless. If you were a painter, you’d never decide to live inside one of your canvases forever. You’d keep on painting.

The relentless and obsessive search for all those things on which we can agree is a confession of bankruptcy.

When we re-learn to live through and by imagination, we enter and invent new space and time.

With imagination, one can solve a problem. More importantly, one can skip ahead of the problem and render it null and void.

Imagination isn’t a system. It might invent systems, but it is non-material. It’s a capacity. It feels no compulsion to imitate reality. It makes realities. Its scope is limited only by a person’s imagining of how far imagination can go.

The human race is obsessed by the question: what exists? It appears to be a far easier question than: what do you want to create? This comparison explains why civilizations decline.

Imagination is a path. Walking on that path long enough, you find answers to all the questions you’ve ever asked, as an incidental side effect of the journey. You also find power that most people only dream of.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Deprogramming the human mind

De-programming the human mind

by Jon Rappoport

January 4, 2015

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

In the late 1980s, hypnotherapist Jack True and I began a research project we loosely called The Underground.

From his side, he came from his experience with patients; from mine, I came from explorations of early Tibetan practices involving imagination exercises.

I kept extensive notes over the years we worked together. Here are several of those notes.

“Once you get rid of the fatuous notion that the mind is the brain, you see mind as a series of spaces in which the individual thinks, ponders, remembers, plans, analyzes, solves, much as an explorer investigates various lands. In this effort, he encounters various programs, which are fixed ways of perceiving and thinking. These programs are ‘the reliables’, and they are usually wrong about everything. They are certainly limited.”

“Programs function like algorithms geared to come up with an ‘average’ answer. An acceptable answer. But they extend far beyond the subjects we are used to contemplating. For example, they reject the possibility that there is space, time, and energy other than those we encounter every day. These programs prevent seeing spaces, times, and energies that don’t belong to this universe or level of existence.”

“During sleep, the programs relax. A person dreams, and in those dreams he inhabits places which are off-limits during waking hours. When he awakes, he labels those experiences so that they lose their intrinsic value and meaning. Psychology, psychiatry, and psychoanalysis are all methods by which the essential raw power and energy of dreams are minimized through analysis and symbolic interpretation. Accordingly, the dreamer didn’t really go anywhere and experience something vivid; he merely threw up symbols on a screen, which can be understood as reflections of his problems and issues. This psychological approach is a social program designed to hem in the individual and keep him in a prison.”


Exit From the Matrix


“In many cultures, a person who has a particularly vivid dream goes to the priest (medicine man, shaman, healer) for interpretation. In most cases, the dreamer receives a piece of guidance that aligns with the culture’s cosmology and reinforces it. More limitation. In fact, what happened during the dream was: the person, temporarily freed from his own mind-programs, ventured out into ‘foreign’ territory and found people and places; he found a different level of life taking place; he watched it or participated in it. In doing so, he received an injection of high-level energy that went beyond what he experienced in waking life. This energy is not of the ordinary physical kind.”

“Mind-programs either prevent or delete moments when a person goes beyond the space, time, and energy of this level of existence. The programs basically induce denial of the first-hand raw experience, and also ‘re-label’ such moments.”

“The traditional story of the mystic portrays a man who has given up living at this level and occupies another realm—but this is a skewed fable intended as a cautionary message. In truth, a person can move in and out of various levels.”

“Traditional spiritual systems actually make use of mind-programs to create safety valves, in the form of promises that, at some point in the future, a person will be able to ascend to a ‘higher place’. These promises satisfy most people.”

“Even if you believe dreams are ‘nothing more than’ acts of imagination, they can impart so much energy to the dreamer they confirm what the early Tibetans knew—unlimited power comes out of imagination.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

The individual vs. the goo

The individual vs. the goo

by Jon Rappoport

December 31, 2014

NoMoreFakeNews.com

OutsideTheRealityMachine

“The people” is a convenient term for “every INDIVIDUAL.”

This has been lost in translation. It has been garbled, distorted, just as the proprietor of an old-fashioned carnival shell game distorts the audience’s perception with sleight of hand.

Are “the people” one group? Well, that’s the ultimate Globalist formulation.

However, from the point of view of the free individual, things are upside down. It is HIS power that is primary, not the monolithic corporate State’s.

From his point of view, what does the social landscape look like?

It looks like: THE OBSESSION TO ORGANIZE.

I’m not talking about organizations that are actually streamlined to produce something of value. I’m talking about organizations that PLAN MORE ORGANIZATION OF LIFE.

If you want to spend a disturbing afternoon, read through (and try to fathom) the bewildering blizzard of sub-organizations that make up the European Union. I did. And I emerged with a new definition of insanity. OTO. The Obsession to Organize.

OTO speaks of a bottomless fear that somewhere, someone might be living free.

THE JOURNEY TO GREATER INDIVIDUAL POWER IS ABOUT: ERASING THE SEPARATE INTERNAL COMPARTMENTS OF ENERGY THE PERSON HIMSELF HAS OVER-ORGANIZED.

Current technological civilization depends on fixed structures and forms and methods and systems. In certain respects, it succeeds brilliantly. But the effect is a very strong tendency to view reality through compartmentalized lenses.

People tend to think their own power is either a delusion or some sort of abstraction that’s never really EXPERIENCED. So when the subject is broached, it goes nowhere. It fizzles out. It garners shrugs and looks of confusion. Power? Are you talking about the ability to lift weights?

And therefore, the whole notion of freedom makes a very small impression, because without power, what’s the message of freedom? A person can choose vanilla or chocolate? He can watch Law&Order or CSI? He can buy a Buick or a Honda? He can take a trip to Yosemite or Disney World? He can pack a lunch or eat out at a restaurant? He can ask for a raise or apply for a better job with another company? That’s it? He can swim in his pool or work out at the gym?

He can take Prozac, or Paxil, or Zoloft?

Mostly, as the years roll by, he opts for more cynicism and tries to become a “smarter realist.” And that is how he closes the book on his life.

Or, if he is attracted to self-improvement, it’s a matter of choosing between cliches. Which cliché sounds better? Which cliché seems to offer more hope for less effort? Which cliché will connect him to people who accept the same cliché?

Every which way power can be discredited or misunderstood…people will discredit it and misunderstand it.

And then all psychological and physiological and mental and physical and emotional and perceptual and hormonal processes undergo a major shift, in order to accommodate to a reality, a space in which the individual has virtually no power at all.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t include this one: “power=greed.” Mountains of propaganda are heaped on people to convince them that having individual power to make something happen is the same as committing crimes against humanity.

Globalism=collectivism=Glob-consciousness. We’re all one Glob. We exist in that great Cheese Melt.

Even the radical Left of the 1960s, who rioted at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, because they believed the nominee, Hubert Humphrey, and his allies wouldn’t stop the war in Vietnam…even that radical force on the Left eventually gave in and morphed into romantic sentimentalists who came to love the State under Obama.

Sooner or later, it comes down to the question: does the individual conceive of himself as an individual, or as part of The Group?

Shall the individual discover how much power and freedom and imagination he actually has, or shall he cut off that process of discovery at the knees, in order to join a group whose aims are diluted and foreshortened versions of consciousness and freedom?

The individual answers these questions overtly, with great consideration, or the questions answer and diminish him through wretched default.

There are people who want their own minds to look exactly like the world. They want their minds to look like photographs of the world. This is what they strive for. The idea that they could invent something is so terrifying they opt instead for the world as it is.

This is what amused the surrealists. They started turning things upside down and inside out. They were reacting to humans who had made themselves into robots. Into robot cameras.

The Surveillance State is a robot camera. It captures everything, based on the premise that what isn’t Normal is dangerous.

The cartels of the world become the cartels of the mind.

At the outbreak of World War 2, the Council on Foreign Relations began making plans for the post-war world.

The question it posed was this: could America exist as a self-sufficient nation, or would it have to go outside its borders for vital resources?

Predictably, the answer was: imperial empire.

The US would not only need to obtain natural resources abroad, it would have to embark on endless conquest to assure continued access.

The CFR, of course, wasn’t just some think tank. It was connected to the highest levels of US government, through the State Department. A front for Rockefeller interests, it actually stood above the government.

Behind all its machinations was the presumption that planned societies were the future of the planet. Not open societies.

Through wars, clandestine operations, legislation, treaties, manipulation of nations’ debt, control of banks and money supplies, countries could be turned into “managed units.”

Increasingly, the populations of countries would be regulated and directed and held in thrall to the State.

And the individual? He would go the way of other extinct species.


Exit From the Matrix


For several decades, the pseudo-discipline called “social science” had been turning out reams of studies and reports on tribes, societal groupings, and so-called classes of people. Groups.

Deeply embedded in the social sciences were psychological warfare specialists who, after World War 2, emerged with a new academic status and new field of study: mass communications.

Their objective? The broadcasting of messages that would, in accordance with political goals, provoke hostility or pacified acceptance in the masses.

Hostility channeled into support of new wars; acceptance of greater domestic government control.

Nowhere in these formulas was the individual protected. He was considered a wild card, a loose cannon, and he needed to be demeaned, made an outsider, and characterized as a criminal who opposed the needs of the collective.

Collective=robot minds welded into one mind.

As the years and decades passed, this notion of the collective and its requirements, in a “humane civilization,” expanded. Never mind that out of view, the rich were getting richer and poor were getting poorer. That fact was downplayed, and the cover story–”share and care”—took center stage.

On every level of society, people were urged to think of themselves as part of a greater group. The individual and his hopes, his unique dreams, his desires and energies, his determination and will power…all these were portrayed as relics of an unworkable and deluded past.

In many cases, lone pioneers who were innovating in directions that could, in fact, benefit all of humanity, were absorbed into the one body of the collective, heralded as humane…and then dumped on the side of the road with their inventions and forgotten.

In the planned society, no one rises above the mass, except those men who run and operate and propagandize the mass.

In order to affect the illusion of individual success, as a kind of safety valve for the yearnings of millions of people, the cult of celebrity emerged. But even there, extraordinary tales of rise and then precipitous fall, glory and then humiliation, were and are presented as cautionary melodramas.

This could happen to you. You would be exposed. You would suffer the consequences. Let others take the fall. Keep your mind blank. Do nothing unusual. Shorten your attention span. Disable your own mental machinery. Then you’ll never be tempted to stand out from the mass.

The onrush of technocracy gears its wild promises to genetic manipulation, brain-machine interfaces, and other automatic downloads assuring “greater life.” No effort required. Plug in, and ascend to new heights.

Freedom? Independence? Old flickering dreams vicariously viewed on a screen.

Individual greatness, imagination, creative power? A sunken galleon loaded with treasure that, upon closer investigation, was never there to begin with.


power outside the matrix


The Plan is all that is important. The plan involves universal surveillance, in order to map the lives of billions of people, move by move, in order to design systems of control within which those billions live, day to day.

But the worst outcome of all is: the individual cannot even conceive of his own life and future in large terms. The individual responds to tighter and control with a shrug, as if to say, “What difference does it make?”

He has bought the collectivist package. His own uniqueness and inner resources are submerged under layers of passive acceptance of the consensus.

And make no mistake about it, this consensus reality, for all its exaltation of the group, is not heraldic in any sense. The propagandized veneer covers a cynical exploitation of every man, woman, and child.

Strapped by an amnesia about his own freedom and what it can truly mean, the individual opts for a place in the collective gloom. He may grumble and complain, but he fits in.

He can’t remember another possibility.

Every enterprise in which he finds himself turns out to be a pale copy of the real thing.

The deep energies and power and desire for freedom remain untapped.

Yet a struggle continues to live. It lives in the hidden places of every individual who wants out, who wants to come back to himself, who wants to stride out on a stage.

Freedom and power again. The shattering of amnesia.

In this stolen world.

The extinct individual returns.

Petty little hungers and obsessions become great hungers.

Dominoes of the collective begin to fall. The whole stinking structure collapses, a wing here and a wing there, and the robots open their eyes and turn off their cameras.

The vast sticky web called “the people” begins to disintegrate in roaring cities and in the mind.

A new instructive message appears on billboards and screens: “normal=crazy.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.