Send your kid to college: support the Surveillance State

Send your kid to college: support the Surveillance State

The NSA is alive and well on campuses

by Jon Rappoport

December 15, 2016

What are college students focusing on these days—apart from sex, booze, and drugs? Well, moral values, if you can call a deep desire for “free everything” a value. And maybe “feeling triggered” and “needing a safe space” is also, somehow, a value. As is demanding that many words be excised from the English language, because they might offend someone who is a member of a designated victim-class. College is quite a scene these days.

Once upon a time, college students were aware of the maxim: follow the money. They did research and discovered what kind of money was keeping their schools afloat. It was an instructive exercise, and it made professors and administrators very nervous, for the right reasons.

Therefore, a different kind of propaganda had to be sprayed on students; the most shallow kind of “social justice” possible—in order to divert these boys and girls from revealing the underlying corruption of their adult minders. Hence, China-style political correctness.

These days, students are, for the most part, oblivious to how their colleges and universities are funded.

I’m not talking about donations from graduates and boosters, or revenue generated from televised football games. I’m talking, for example, about secretive government agencies.

CIA, NSA, DIA (Defense Intelligence Agency).

At WikiLeaks, Julian Assange posted an overview (10/7/2007), “On the take and loving it—academic recipients of the US intelligence budget.”

Consider Assange’s stunning conclusion: “Over the last decade, U.S intelligence funding of academic research has taken on cavalier, even brazen qualities. This article reveals over 3,000 National Security Agency and over 100 Defense Intelligence Agency funded papers [written by professors] and draws attention to recent unreported revelations of CIA funding for torture research.”

Torture research. If people need evidence that the CIA’s MKULTRA is still alive, there it is.

Assange: “The NSA has pushed tens or hundreds of millions into the academy [colleges] through research grants using one particular grant code. NSA funding sources are often nakedly, even proudly, declared in research papers (‘I may be nothing, but look, a big gang threw me a sovereign’). Some researchers try to conceal or otherwise downplay the source using accepted covers, weasel words and acronyms, yet commonality in the NSA grant code prefix makes all these attempts transparent. The primary NSA grant-code prefix is MDA904.”

“An examination of academic papers referencing the code gives the impression that most or all research grantees know the true source of their funding. These are not academics who have been fooled. These are willing, even eager, participants.”

The NSA uses a number of “contracting and grant making light covers,” Assange writes. Among them: Maryland Procurement Office, Department of Defense, DOD, ARDA.”

Naturally, all the NSA grants to academics are for research on how to spy. Don’t be fooled by the numerous NSA awards for work in abstract mathematics. The NSA’s interest in math per se is zero. The Agency seeks to apply the research to universal snooping.

College students who claim to be activists can dig into records and discover what grants the NSA is making to their professors.

The students can name names. They can make the facts public on campus and stage protests. They can demand de-funding and cutting NSA relationships. They can refuse to enroll in those professors’ classes.

A quick search led me to two high-ranked American colleges, Bard and Claremont McKenna. Bard openly offers its faculty assistance in applying for grants. Among the funding sources listed: NSA.

An article at the Claremont McKenna site celebrates a $40,000 NSA grant to Professor Lenny Fukshansky, a mathematician, to further his work in “Analytic techniques and algebraic constructions in geometric lattice theory.”

Nothing to see there, students. It’s just lattices. How could NSA use them, other than to hang plants in their offices to brighten the environment?

“Hi, I’m Professor Genius-IQ Doofus. I work for the Surveillance State. Don’t bother turning off your cell phones while you’re in class. The NSA is spying on you through them, and I’m helping the NSA. Now let’s learn some kick-ass math.”

If college students followed these trails, they would eventually discover something far more shocking. The Surveillance State itself is part of a technocratic agenda of control. Patrick Wood alludes to this in his brilliant 2015 book, Technocracy Rising. The “scientific” transformation of political power involves engineering society from top to bottom, and fitting every citizen into a detailed plan of permitted energy consumption.


power outside the matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)


Instead of worrying about whether holiday cookies shaped like evergreen trees or personal pronouns or bathrooms align with politically correct standards, students could turn their attention to how the world is being stolen out from under seven billion people.

Of course, students would prefer to think that theft is actually a signal of a coming utopia. The State is mommy, daddy, and a messiah. The State is good. “From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs.”

Memo to parents: Yes, send your kids to college. It’ll only cost you tens of thousands a year. Or your kid could take out a student loan and owe a couple of hundred thousand after he graduates and can’t find a job because he has no skills. It’s a great deal.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

Zika, Florida, NSA Hillary emails, Obama signs Dark Act

Zika, Florida, NSA Hillary emails, Obama signs GMO Dark Act

Give us your urine

by Jon Rappoport

August 2, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)

Every day in the news business is a fake day.

Headlines and articles smear lies, cover stories, distractions, diversions, and phony parroting across the landscape. And headlines that would reveal important truth are omitted.

The gullible buy in and submit themselves to prime-A mind control.

Here are three current stories I have covered in detail already:

Zika, Florida (one Miami area is the focus): the CDC has issued a travel warning. Pregnant women, or women planning to become pregnant, should avoid this area. Feds are going door asking for urine samples, to test for Zika.

But every effort in Brazil, America, Colombia and other countries to link Zika to the birth defect called microcephaly has failed. Utterly. (Zika article archive here)

The correlation between the presence of Zika and cases of microcephaly is so weak, so thin, that researchers have resorted to a bumbling “add-on” analysis. It goes this way:

“If we can find several groups in which Zika and microcephaly are barely connected at all, and combine these findings, we can say they add up to a convincing case.”

In Brazil, embarrassed researchers have simply given up trying to show a correlation between Zika and the birth defect. They simply assert the connection, despite the fact that, at best, Zika is present in perhaps one-fifth of all microcephaly cases.

By any scientific measure, this constitutes counter-evidence that Zika causes microcephaly. But it doesn’t deter the CDC or the World Health Organization. They march on, their message of unrelenting fear fed directly into the brain of the mainstream press, and out into the public. The promise? A blockbuster vaccine, and high profits for Pharma.

Shifting to Hillary Clinton: her email scandal is, at the least, a case of extreme gross negligence in the handling of classified materials. FBI Director Comey said as much, several weeks ago, as he recommended no-prosecution during a global press conference.

“She’s guilty as hell, but we shouldn’t take her to court.”

Comey, acting as if he were, suddenly, a Grand Jury, the US Attorney General, and an appellate judge, misread the Federal Penal Statute—which specifically states that intent to do harm is irrelevant, and gross negligence is the standard—and dismissed a felony case against Hillary out of hand.

Now, Bill Binney, a former high-level NSA analyst who exposed the Agency’s crimes long before Ed Snowden emerged, states that the NSA would actually have all her emails, including the ones which were deleted and never turned over to the Justice Department.

Not only that, the NSA would, as a matter of course, share this information with the FBI and the CIA. In other words, the FBI has been posturing for over a year, in its comments about the missing emails. They could have access to them with a single request.

But mainstream press outlets are ignoring these new revelations. The Hillary case is history. Nothing to see. It’s old news. She’s been exonerated. She’s good to go in her campaign to win the Presidency. That’s the unanimous mainstream consensus.

And finally, Obama has signed the Dark Act, the federal bill which guts the right of any state to clearly label food products containing GMOs. Instead, a new federal standard will be developed—a so-called Q rating system. Under this program, which may possibly be implemented in the next five years, consumers can, if they’re aware, stop shopping and use their i-phones (or an 800 number) to discover what a “Q” means for a given product. Shop all day, check up on four products.

Good luck. Monsanto wins. As I’ve detailed, Obama is the GMO President. He has appointed a whole raft of former Monsanto people to key posts in his administration. He has let more new GMO food crops in the door than any President. This, despite his nudge and wink to supporters during his first run for the White House—signaling that he was on their side, and would make sure they’d know what was in their food. It was all con all the time.

But of course, the mainstream press is giving this zero coverage. There was barely a mention the other day when he signed the new federal bill making GMO labels a cumbersome and useless piece of nonsense.

It’s a good and great thing that mainstream news is dying like a giant corpse who insists on continuing to walk down the street. The New York Times, which keeps re-financing its debt, is showing disastrous numbers for ad-sales revenue this quarter. I’m waiting for the death rattle, when all Times’ front-page stories will center on celebrities and their peccadillos. “Goofy Toofy, Reality Star, shows off her very pregnant shape on a beach in Monaco, in a tiny bikini you won’t believe.” “The British Queen’s fourth cousin’s nephew tries to grow a beard in support of unlimited European immigration.”

Yes, why not go all the way? The Times reporters would love it. Instead of channeling lies out of certified experts, they could make it all up. Low gossip is a lot easier than high gossip.


The Matrix Revealed


Meanwhile, pretending a Presidential candidate is innocent of a felony that could carry a 10-year sentence, opening the way to unlabeled GMO anything-and-everything, and blaming a harmless virus for a birth defect that has existed for centuries—it’s just another day at the office.

“Want to grab a few drinks after work?”

“Sure.”

“What are you working on?”

“A story about how Putin created ISIS when he was fourteen years old.”

“Sounds good. Who’s your source on it?”

“Osama Bin Laden.”

“Isn’t he dead?”

“The FBI just found a few hundred emails he sent to Putin in 1973.”

“Good show.”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

The rise of the meta-criminal

The rise of the meta-criminal

Is the NSA manipulating the stock market?

by Jon Rappoport

May 24, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

Trevor Timm of the Electronic Freedom Frontier dug up a very interesting nugget. It was embedded in the heralded December 2013 White House task force report on spying and snooping.

Under Recommendations, #31, section 2, he found this:

“Governments should not use their offensive cyber capabilities to change the amounts held in financial accounts or otherwise manipulate financial systems.”

Timm quite rightly wondered: why were these warnings in the report?

Were the authors just anticipating a possible crime? Or were they reflecting the fact that the NSA had already been engaging in the crime?

If this was just a bit of anticipation, why leave it naked in the report? Why not say there was no current evidence the NSA had been manipulating financial systems?

Those systems would, of course, include the stock market, and all trading markets around the world.

Well, there is definite evidence of other NSA financial snooping. From Spiegel Online, “‘Follow the Money’: NSA Spies on International Payments,” 9/15/13:

“The National Security Agency (NSA) widely monitors international payments, banking and credit card transactions, according to documents seen by SPIEGEL.”

“The NSA’s Tracfin data bank also contained data from the Brussels-based Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT), a network used by thousands of banks to send transaction information securely…the NSA spied on the organization on several levels, involving, among others, the [NSA] agency’s ‘tailored access operations’ division…”

The NSA’s “tailored access operations” division uses roughly 1000 hackers and analysts in its spying efforts.

The next step in all this spying would naturally involve penetrating trading markets and, using the deep data obtained, manipulate the markets to the advantage of the NSA and preferred clients.

The amount of money siphoned off in such an ongoing operation would be enormous.

“Looking over the shoulder” of Wall St. insiders would be child’s play for NSA.

Ditto for predicting political events that would temporarily drive markets down and provide golden opportunities for highly profitable short selling.

Like drug traffickers and other mobsters, the NSA could invest their ill-gotten gains in legitimate enterprises and reap additional rewards.

And if the Pentagon, under which the NSA is organized, requires heavy amounts of money for off-the-books black budget ops, what better place to go than their own NSA?

All in all, when you operate the biggest spying and data-gathering operation in the world, the opportunities abound. Yes, knowledge is power, when the distinctions between legal and illegal are brushed off like a few gnats on a summer day.

The Surveillance State has created an apparatus whose implications are staggering. It’s a different world now. And sometimes it takes a writer of fiction to flesh out the larger landscape.

Brad Thor’s novel, Black List, posits the existence of a monster corporation, ATS, which stands alongside the NSA in collecting information on every move we make. ATS’ intelligence-gathering capability is unmatched anywhere in the world.

On pages 117-118 of Black List, Thor makes a stunning inference that, on reflection, is as obvious as the fingers on your hand:

“For years ATS had been using its technological superiority to conduct massive insider trading. Since the early 1980s, the company had spied on anyone and everyone in the financial world. They listened in on phone calls, intercepted faxes, and evolved right along with the technology, hacking internal computer networks and e-mail accounts. They created mountains of ‘black dollars’ for themselves, which they washed through various programs they were running under secret contract, far from the prying eyes of financial regulators.

“Those black dollars were invested into hard assets around the world, as well as in the stock market, through sham, offshore corporations. They also funneled the money into reams of promising R&D projects, which eventually would be turned around and sold to the Pentagon or the CIA.

“In short, ATS had created its own license to print money and had assured itself a place beyond examination or reproach.”

In real life, with the NSA heading up the show, the outcome would be the same.

It would be as Thor describes it.

We think about total surveillance as being directed at private citizens, but the capability has unlimited payoffs when it targets financial markets and the people who have intimate knowledge of them.

“Total security awareness” programs of surveillance are ideal spying ops in the financial arena, designed to suck up millions of bits of inside information, then utilizing them to make investments and suck up billions (trillions?) of dollars.

It gives new meaning to “the rich get richer.”

Taking the overall scheme to another level, consider this: those same heavy hitters who have unfettered access to financial information can also choose, at opportune moments, to expose certain scandals and crimes (not their own, of course).

In this way, they can, at their whim, cripple governments, banks, and corporations. They can cripple investment houses, insurance companies, and hedge funds. Or, alternatively, they can merely blackmail these organizations.

We think we know how scandals are exposed by the press, but actually we don’t. Tips are given to people who give them to other people. Usually, the first clue that starts the ball rolling comes from a source who remains in the shadows.

We are talking about the creation and managing of realities on all sides, including the choice of when and where and how to provide a glimpse of a crime or scandal.

The information matrix can be tapped into and plumbed, and it can also be used to dispense choice clusters of data that end up constituting the media reality of painted pictures which, every day, show billions of people “what’s news.”

It’s likely that the probe Ron Paul was once pushing—audit the Federal Reserve—has already been done by those who control unlimited global surveillance. They already know far more than any Congressional investigation will uncover. If they know the deepest truths, they can use them to blackmail, manipulate, and control the Fed itself.

In this global-surveillance world, we need to ask new questions and think along different lines now.

For example, how long before the mortgage-derivative crisis hit did the Masters of Surveillance know, from spying on bank records, that insupportable debt was accumulating at a lethal pace? What did they do with that information?

When did they know that at least a trillion dollars was missing from Pentagon accounting books, as Donald Rumsfeld eventually admitted on September 10, 2001, and what did they do with that information?

When did they know the details of the Libor rate-fixing scandal? Press reports indicate that Barclays was trying to rig interest rates as early as January 2005.

Have they tracked, in detail, the men responsible for recruiting hired mercenaries and terrorists, who eventually wound up in Syria pretending to be an authentic rebel force?

Have they collected detailed accounts of the most private plans of Bilderberg, CFR, and Trilateral Commission leaders?

For global surveillance kings, what we think of as the future is, in many respects the present and the past.

It’s a new world. These overseers of universal information-detection can enter and probe the most secret caches of data, collect, collate, cross reference, and assemble them into vital bottom-lines. By comparison, an operation like Wikileaks is an old Model-T Ford.


power outside the matrix


Previously, we thought we needed to look over the shoulders of the men who were committing major crimes out of public view. But now, if we want to be up to date, we also have to factor in the men who are spying on those criminals, who are gathering up those secrets and using them to commit their own brand of meta-crime.

And in the financial arena, that means we think of Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan as perpetrators, yes, but we also think about the men who already know everything about GS and Morgan, and are using this knowledge to steal sums that might make GS and Morgan blush with envy.

No, we’re not in Kansas anymore. But wherever we’ve gone to, the NSA is already there, and they’ve been tapping in, taking out, and using untold bits of data to stage and profit from events of yesterday, today, and tomorrow.

Time, in that sense, has ballooned, expanded, turned inside out, exploded, and laid itself flat on a table, for close inspection by the eyes of Surveillance Central.

Understanding this, we need to analyze what is happening in the world with a new dimension of criminal reality-maker in mind.

The meta-criminal.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free emails at NoMoreFakeNews.com or OutsideTheRealityMachine.

CIA denies request for info on Edward Snowden

CIA denies request for info on Edward Snowden

Matrix One: who is Edward Snowden?

by Jon Rappoport

January 7, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

“The Matrix can be looked at as one gigantic covert op. It spills over with cover stories and lies and false trails, to conceal what is actually going on under the surface. The information- specialists have to make the surface seem true, so no one bothers to look underneath it. Keep in mind that media stories, no matter how absurd they are, tend to be believed because they’re simpler than the truth, and people want simple. If the Times says three terrorists jumped out of a mule’s ass on a quiet road and killed a group of tourists, and you come along and propose that the attack was actually the result of a multi-bank money transfer and three idiot dupes who were pumped up by an FBI informant, part of the reason your scenario is rejected is because the mule’s-ass version has only one step…” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

Update: the CIA has just refused a FIOA request for information about its former employee, Edward Snowden.

The request was filed on November 15 by John Young, the owner of Cryptome.org. The CIA’s response, dated December 29, refers to Young’s query seeking “records granting Edward Joseph Snowden access to classified information…[and] records indicating Mr. Snowden[‘s] compliance with controls of classified information upon leaving the CIA.”

The CIA’s letter to Young states, “…the CIA can neither confirm nor deny the existence or nonexistence of records responsive to your request.” The CIA letter states that any other response would violate rules governing classification of data.

Bottom line: the CIA has nothing specific to say about Snowden’s status while he worked for the Agency.

Once again, the question of exactly who Edward Snowden is resurfaces.

Of course, that question is taboo in major media. All we’re given is: Snowden worked as a contractor for the NSA, he stole vital information, he gave it to journalists, and they are gradually releasing it.

And those who support Snowden consider him an exceptional hero, about whom unpleasant questions should never be asked. He did a wonderful thing; end of story.

Well, what about this: in the wake of Snowden’s revelations and the consequent press coverage, a few billion people know something they didn’t quite know before. They know their lives are under surveillance. What better way to enforce the Surveillance State than by letting people know it exists, so they’ll police and censor themselves? Can this element be legitimately considered in the telling of the Snowden story? Or must it be ignored and rejected out of hand?

Who is former CIA employee Edward Snowden?

As we go along, keep in mind that intelligence-agency personnel live in order to tell low-level and high-level lies. They tend to fall into a suicidal funk if they aren’t lying on at least three or four levels at once.

Let’s look at Snowden’s brief history as reported by The Guardian (“Edward Snowden: the whistleblower behind the NSA surveillance revelations”, by Glen Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill, and Laura Poitras in Hong Kong, 11 June 2013):

In 2003, at age 19, without a high school diploma, Snowden enlists in the Army. He begins a training program to join the Special Forces. At what point after enlistment can a new soldier start this elite training program?

Snowden breaks both legs in an exercise. He’s discharged from the Army. Is that automatic? How about healing and then resuming service?

If he was accepted in the Special Forces training program because he had special computer skills, then why discharge him simply because he broke both legs? Just asking. Just a thought.

“Sorry, Ed, but with two broken legs we just don’t think you can hack into terrorist data anymore. You were good, but not now. Try Walmart. They always have openings.”

Circa 2003, Snowden gets a job as a security guard for an NSA facility at the University of Maryland. He specifically wanted to work for NSA? Or was it just a generic job opening near his home he found out about? Nothing worth discovering here? Nothing to see?

Snowden shifts jobs. Boom. He’s now in the CIA, in IT. He apparently has no high school diploma.

In 2007, Snowden is sent to Geneva. He’s only 23 years old. The CIA gives him a diplomat cover story. He’s put in charge of maintaining computer-network security for the CIA and US diplomats. Major job. Obviously, he has access to a wide range of classified documents. Sound a little odd? He’s just a kid.

During this period, in Geneva, one of the incidents that really sours Snowden on the CIA is the “turning of a Swiss banker.” One night, CIA guys get a banker drunk, encourage him to drive home, the banker gets busted, the CIA guys help him out, and then with that bond formed, they eventually get the banker to reveal deep financial secrets to the Agency.

This sours Snowden? He’s that naïve? He doesn’t know by now that the CIA does this sort of thing all the time? He’s shocked? He “didn’t sign up for this?” He doesn’t already know about CIA assassinations and engineered regime changes? MKULTRA?

In 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA. Why? Presumably because he’s disillusioned. It should noted here that Snowden claimed he could do very heavy damage to the entire US intelligence community in 2008, but decided to wait because he thought Obama, just coming into the Presidency, might keep his “transparency” promise.

After two years with the CIA in Geneva, Snowden really had the capability to take down the whole US inter-agency intelligence network, or a major chunk of it?

If you buy that without further inquiry, I have condos for sale on the dark side of the moon.

In 2009, Snowden leaves the CIA and goes to work in the private sector. Dell, Booze Allen Hamilton. In this latter job, Snowden is assigned to work at the NSA.

He’s an outsider, but, again, he claims to have so much access to so much sensitive NSA data that he can take down the whole US intelligence network in a single day. The. Whole. US. Intelligence. Network.

This is Ed Snowden’s sketchy legend. To anyone familiar with intelligence legends and cover stories, it’s mostly red flags, alarm bells, sirens, flashing lights.

Then we have the crowning piece: they solved the riddle: Ed Snowden was able to steal thousands of highly protected NSA documents because…he had a thumb drive.

It’s the weapon that breached the inner sanctum of the most sophisticated information agency in the world.

It’s the weapon to which the NSA, with all its resources, remains utterly vulnerable. Can’t defeat it.

Not only did Snowden stroll into NSA with a thumb drive, he knew how to navigate all the security layers put in place to stop people from stealing classified documents.

“Let’s see. We have a new guy coming to work for us here at NSA today? Oh, whiz kid. Ed Snowden. Outside contractor. Booz Allen. He’s not really an in-house employee of the NSA. Twenty-nine years old. No high school diploma. Has a GED. He worked for the CIA and quit. Hmm. Why did he quit? Oh, never mind, who cares? No problem.

“Tell you what. Let’s give this kid access to our most sensitive data. Sure. Why not? Everything. That stuff we keep behind 986 walls? Where you have to pledge the life of your first-born against the possibility you’ll go rogue? Let Snowden see it all. Sure. What the hell. I’m feeling charitable. He seems like a nice kid.”

NSA is the most awesome spying agency in this world. If you cross the street in Podunk, Anywhere, USA, to buy an ice cream soda, on a Tuesday afternoon in July, they know.

They know whether you sit at the counter and drink that soda or take it and move to the only table in the store.

But this agency, with all its vast power and its dollars…

Can’t track one of its own, as he steals the whole store. Can’t keep the store locked. And they can’t track the later movements of this man who made up a story about needing treatment in Hong Kong for epilepsy and then skipped the country.

Just can’t find him.

Can’t find him in Hong Kong, where he does a sit-down video interview with Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian. Can’t find that “safe house” or that “hotel” where he’s staying.

No. Can’t find him or spy on his communications while he’s in Hong Kong. Can’t figure out he’s booked a flight to Russia. Can’t intercept him at the airport before he leaves for Russia. Too difficult.

And this man, this employee, is walking around with four laptops that contain the keys to all the secret spying knowledge in the known cosmos.

Can’t locate those laptops. The most brilliant technical minds of this or any other generation can find a computer in Outer Mongolia in the middle of a blizzard, but these walking-around computers in Hong Kong are somehow beyond reach.

And, again, before this man, Snowden, this employee, skipped Hawaii, he was able to access a principal segment of the layout of the entire US intelligence network. Yes.

Not only that, but anyone who worked at this super-agency as an analyst, as a systems-analyst supervisor, could have done the same thing. Could have stolen the keys to the kingdom.

This is why NSA geniuses with IQs over 180 decided, in the aftermath of the Snowden affair, that they needed to draft “tighter rules and procedures” for their employees. Right.

Pieces of internal of security they hadn’t realized they needed before would be put in place.

This is, let me remind you, the most secretive spying agency in the world. The richest spying agency. The smartest spying agency.

But somehow, over the years, they’d overlooked their own security. They’d left doors open, so that any one of their own analyst-supervisors could steal everything.

Could take it all. Could just snatch it away and copy it and store it on a few laptops.

But now, yes, having been made aware of this vulnerability, the agency will make corrections.

Sure.

And reporters for elite media don’t find any of this hard to swallow.

On the ever-solicitous Charley Rose, a gaggle of pundits/newspeople warned that Ed Snowden, walking around with those four laptops, could be an easy target for Chinese spies or Russian spies, who could get access to the data on those computers.

But the NSA can’t. No.

The tightest and strongest and richest and smartest spying agency in the world can’t find its own employee. It’s in the business of tracking, and it can’t find him.

It’s in the business of security, and it can’t protect its own data from its employees.

If you instantly believe all that, with no questions, I have timeshares to sell in the black hole in the center of the Milky Way.

Here is a different possible scenario. Is it any less likely than the one we’ve been treated to?

Snowden was working an op, either as a dupe or knowingly. He was working for…well, let’s see, who would that be?

Who was he working for before he entered the private sector and wound up at NSA?

The CIA.

Would that be the same CIA who competes, on certain levels, with the NSA?

The same CIA who’s watched its own prestige and funding diminish, as human intelligence has given way to electronic snooping?

Yes, it would be. CIA just can’t match the NSA when it comes to gathering signals-intell.

Wired Magazine, June 2013 issue (“NSA Snooping Was Only the Beginning. Meet the Spy Chief Leading Us Into Cyberwar”, 06.12.13). James Bamford, author of three books on the NSA, states:

“In April, as part of its 2014 budget request, the Pentagon [which rules the NSA] asked Congress for $4.7 billion for increased ‘cyberspace operations,’ nearly $1 billion more than the 2013 allocation. At the same time, budgets for the CIA and other intelligence agencies were cut by almost the same amount, $4.4 billion. A portion of the money going to…[NSA] will be used to create 13 cyberattack teams.”

That means spying money. Far more for NSA, far less for CIA.

Turf war.

Suppose people at the CIA, genuine experts, carefully, over time, were able to access those NSA documents, and handed them to Snowden—or patiently, and at length, or showed Snowden how to execute that quite sophisticated piece of access-trickery? Because (more believably) NSA’s internal security was very good. It wasn’t (far less believably) a bumble-dumb of mismanaged amateur clockwork. It was quite tight, so tight that a man like Snowden wouldn’t have been able to move through it like a ghost.

The CIA, of course, couldn’t be seen as the NSA leaker. They needed a guy. They needed a guy who could appear to be from the NSA, to make things look worse for the NSA and shield the CIA.

They had Ed Snowden. He had worked for the CIA in Geneva, in a high-level position, overseeing computer-systems security.

Somewhere in his CIA past, Libertarian and freedom-loving Ed meets a fellow CIA guy who sits down with him and says, “You know, Ed, things have gone too damn far. The NSA is spying on everybody all the time. I can show you proof. They’ve gone beyond the point of trying to catch terrorists. They’re doing something else. They’re expanding a Surveillance State, which can only lead to one thing: the destruction of America, what America stands for, what you and I know America is supposed to be. The NSA isn’t like us, Ed. We go after terrorists for real. That’s it. Whereas NSA goes after everybody. We have to stop it. We need a guy…and there are those of us who think you might be that guy…”

This could be a straight con, or a few CIA people could have actually wanted to torpedo the NSA for its unlimited surveilling operations.

Ed says, “Tell me more. I’m intrigued.”

He eventually buys in.

And the CIA will eventually find a way to protect and shield him while he’s escaping the US and staying in Hong Kong.

Put two scenarios on the truth scale and assess them. Which is more likely? The tale Snowden told to Glenn Greenwald, with all its holes, with its super-naive implications about the fumbling, bumbling NSA, or a scenario in which Snowden is the CIA’s boy?

Let me enhance my alternative scenario and branch it out. If Snowden is still working for the CIA, he and his buds aren’t the only people who want to take the NSA down a notch. No. Because, for example, NSA has been spying on everybody inside the Beltway.

Spying on politicians with secrets.

That includes a major, major, prime NSA target: Congress.

Do you think members of Congress with heavy secrets enjoy knowing NSA is over their shoulders?

Imagine this conversation taking place, in a car, on a lonely road outside Washington, late at night. The speakers are Congressman X and a contractor representing a covert unit inside the NSA:

“Well, Congressman, do you remember January 6th? A Monday afternoon, a men’s room in the park off—”

“What the hell are you talking about!”

“A stall in the men’s room. The kid. He was wearing white high-tops. A Skins cap. T-shirt. Dark hair. Scar across his left cheek. Blue tattoo on his right thigh.”

“Jesus.”

Dead silence.

“What do you want?” says the Congressman, now trapped.

Imagine this one: “Senator, we know about the underage cheerleader in Ohio. Your trip there in 2010, just before the election.”

Blackmail on the hoof.

If you’re a Congressman or a Senator with nasty secrets, and you know NSA is spying on you, because it’s spying on everyone in the Congress, who’s your potential best friend?

Somebody who can go up against the NSA, somebody who wants to go up against the NSA.

And who might that be?

The CIA?

It’s not perfect, but it’s the best you can do.

So if you’re a Congressman, you go to a friend in the CIA and you have a chat about “the NSA problem.” How can you get NSA off your back? Your CIA friend has his own concerns about NSA.

He tells you in confidence: “Look, maybe we can help you. We know a lot about the NSA. We have good people. You might say one of our jobs is watching the watchers at NSA, to, uh, make sure they don’t go too far in their spying.”

This sounds interesting. If you have to sell your soul, you’d rather sell it to the CIA than the NSA. It’s a judgment call.

And a few months later, a year later…you read about Ed Snowden blowing a hole in the NSA. You take note of the fact that Snowden worked for the CIA. He worked for them in Geneva. Then he left for the private sector and got himself assigned to the NSA.

Hmm. Maybe you have some cause for optimism. Maybe your CIA friend is helping you out.

Some schmuck reporter asks you about the current NSA scandal and you say, “Of course we have to protect classified data, in order to prevent terrorist attacks. But at the same time, we need to respect the Bill of Rights. People can’t go around spying on anyone for no reason.”

You’re sending your own signal.

You’re tipping your CIA guy. You appreciate his help, if in fact he’s helping you. You can’t ask him directly. If you did, he’d never give you a straight answer. But just in case…you’re tipping him off.

At the same time, you’re wondering how many people in Congress are so controlled by the NSA that they’d never try to break out? How many people, with how many secrets, are so deeply blackmailed they’d never dare go up against NSA?

This is an important calculation. The battle might already be lost. You might not stand a chance. Maybe nobody can help you. Maybe you can’t escape.

Maybe you shouldn’t even hint that NSA has overstepped its legal boundaries by spying on Americans.

That’s the conundrum that keeps you up at night.

What if the spies spying on their own government are running the government beyond the ability of anyone to stop them?

You don’t give a damn about what this would mean for America. You only care about what it means for you and your secrets.

Maybe this is the jail you’re in for the rest of your life.

When you’re back in your home state showing your face and giving speeches, and a voter comes up to you and voices a concern about his dwindling paycheck, his house payment, his endangered pension…and when you nod and gaze out at the horizon, as if to pluck a magic answer from the ether, you’re really thinking about the conundrum.

You’re thinking about the life sentence you’re serving in the Surveillance State.

And that night, in your hotel room, you get down on your knees and pray that Ed Snowden is still working for the CIA.

Who else, besides the CIA and numerous politicians inside the Beltway, would be aching to take the NSA down a notch? Who else would be rooting hard for this former (?) CIA employee, Snowden, to succeed?

How about Wall Street?

Still waiting to be uncovered? NSA spying to collect elite financial data, spying on the people who have that data: the major investment banks. NSA scooping up that data to predict, manipulate, and profit from trading markets all over the world.

A trillion-dollar operation.

Snowden worked for Booz Allen, which is owned by the Carlyle Group ($170 billion in assets). Carlyle, the infamous. Their money is making money in 160 investment funds.

A few of Carlyle’s famous front men in its history: George HW Bush, James Baker (US Secretary of State), Frank Carlucci (US Secretary of Defense and CIA Deputy Director), John Major (British Prime Minister), Arthur Levitt (Chairman of the SEC).

Suppose you’re one of the princes in the NSA castle, and Ed Snowden has just gone public with your documents. You’re saying, “Let’s see, this kid worked for Booz Allen, which is owned by the Carlyle Group. We (NSA) have been spying over Carlyle’s shoulder, stealing their proprietary financial data. What are the chances they’re getting a little revenge on us now?”

Yes, you’re thinking about that. You’re looking into it.

The Surveillance State has created an apparatus whose implications are staggering. It’s a different world now. And sometimes it takes a writer of fiction to flesh out the larger landscape.

Brad Thor’s novel, Black List, posits the existence of a monster corporation, ATS, that stands alongside the NSA in collecting information on every move we make. ATS’ intelligence-gathering capability is unmatched anywhere in the world.

On pages 117-118 of Black List, Thor makes a stunning inference that, on reflection, is as obvious as the fingers on your hand:

“For years ATS [substitute “NSA”] had been using its technological superiority to conduct massive insider trading. Since the early 1980s, the company had spied on anyone and everyone in the financial world. They listened in on phone calls, intercepted faxes, and evolved right along with the technology, hacking internal computer networks and e-mail accounts. They created mountains of ‘black dollars’ for themselves, which they washed through various programs they were running under secret contract, far from the prying eyes of financial regulators.

“Those black dollars were invested into hard assets around the world, as well as in the stock market, through sham, offshore corporations. They also funneled the money into reams of promising R&D projects, which eventually would be turned around and sold to the Pentagon or the CIA.

“In short, ATS had created its own license to print money and had assured itself a place beyond examination or reproach.”

In real life, whether the prime criminal source is one monster corporation or the NSA itself, the outcome would be the same.

Total surveillance has unlimited payoffs when it targets financial markets and the people who have intimate knowledge of them.

“Total security awareness” programs of surveillance are ideal spying ops in the financial arena, designed to grab millions of bits of inside information, and then utilize them to make investments and suck up billions (trillions?) of dollars.

It gives new meaning to “the rich get richer.”

Think about Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan. Think about the NSA men who already know everything about GS and Morgan, and are using this knowledge to steal sums that might make GS and Morgan blush with envy.

Goldman Sachs, Chase, and Morgan consider trillion-dollar trading markets their own private golden-egg farm. They run it, they own it, they manipulate it for their own ends.

If NSA has been looking over their shoulders for the past 30 years, discovering all their knowledge, and operating a meta- invasion, siphoning off enormous profits, NSA would rate as their Enemy Number One.

And would need to be torpedoed.

Enter Ed Snowden.


power outside the matrix


In this piece, I’m balancing and comparing the likelihood of various “Snowden scenarios.” The scenario we’ve been fed is severely lacking in credibility. It has less credibility than the alternatives I’ve sketched out.

For those who think the blizzard of US intelligence agencies is one unified whole, think again. These agencies do cooperate with each other, but they also compete. Competing, lying, subverting, and inventing cover stories is their daily vocation. A day without lying is a day without happiness.

Of course, it’s easier, and in the case of the standard Snowden tale, more gratifying, to accept what major media present to us. Their stories are less disturbing, and simpler, than the complex machinations of truth.

As yet, no reporters have faced off with Snowden and relentlessly asked him probing questions about himself. Why is that? Do the reporters with access avoid looking a gift horse in the mouth? Do they prefer painting a heroic picture of the man? Do they think that revealing some stranger truth about him would undercut and undermine what he has brought to light? Or has Snowden himself brusquely cut short any potential attempt to peer deeper than the surface of his words?

There is now a journalistic “Snowden industry.” The few reporters he has favored have made out well. I don’t begrudge them their money, but I would say that, to the degree Snowden must remain an unblemished champion for the industry to continue succeeding, there is a blind spot. There are unwarranted assumptions that preclude a serious asking of the question:

Who is Edward Snowden?

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

NSA spying rolls up US Congress. Bombshell? Kidding?

NSA spying rolls up US Congress. Bombshell? Kidding?

“Let’s pretend we’re surprised”

by Jon Rappoport

December 30, 2015

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

Breaking: While Obama was pursuing the Iran nuclear deal, he wanted to know what Israeli leaders were up to, so he accessed NSA reports. NSA was spying on Netanyahu and other Israeli officials. The thing was, the Israelis were talking on the phone to members of the US Congress. Oops. So it turned out NSA was spying on Congress, as well.

But wait. This story, now being reported as a shocker, is…no surprise at all. It’s business as usual for the NSA. The shock and outrage is fake. Who’s kidding who?

The NSA is a Pentagon agency, and the Pentagon is part of the Executive Branch of government. Of course it’s been spying on the Legislative Branch. If it weren’t, it wouldn’t be doing its job.

Several years ago, Ed Snowden made the following statement (ABC News aired the video clip): “I, sitting at my [NSA] desk, certainly had the authority to wiretap anyone, from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if I had a personal email.”

There was a brief “firestorm” in the press about it, and it went down the memory hole.

Then, a year ago, there was this—FOX News, 1/9/14, by Andrew Napolitano: “Last week, Sen. Bernie Sanders, (I-Vt.), wrote to Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Administration (NSA), and asked plainly whether the NSA has been or is now spying on members of Congress or other public officials…The NSA did reply to Sanders by stating — in an absurd oxymoron — that members of Congress receive the same constitutional protections as other Americans: that is to say, none from the NSA…The NSA’s refusal to answer Sanders’ question directly is a tacit admission, because we are all well aware that the NSA collects identifying data on and the content of virtually every email, text message and phone call sent or received in the U.S.”

Boom. Another quick explosion in the press; then, nothing.

And it wasn’t just the NSA. It was the CIA, too. Read this, from the Huffington Post, 3/11/14: “Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), a staunch defender of government surveillance of ordinary citizens, took to the Senate floor Tuesday with the stunning accusation that the Central Intelligence Agency may have violated federal law to spy on Congress…Feinstein, head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, railed against the CIA for compromising the legislative branch’s oversight role — a theme echoed by many of her Senate colleagues throughout the day. The outrage was palpable among lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, and some suggested CIA Director John Brennan should resign if the allegations are true. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who has stuck up for intelligence agencies in the past, declared a potential war…‘This is Richard Nixon stuff,’ Graham told reporters. ‘This is dangerous to the democracy. Heads should roll, people should go to jail if it’s true. If it is, the legislative branch should declare war on the CIA.’”

Once again, outrage, then nothing. This suggests that NSA and CIA have enough illegally-obtained, damaging information on members of Congress to basically keep them quiet and docile—aside from occasional outbursts.

There is more. Back in 1975, the US Senate Intelligence Committee, headed by Frank Church, carried out an extensive investigation of US intelligence agencies. Peter Fenn wrote about that piece of history on 9/27/13, at usnews: “Those of us who were staff members of the Church Committee investigating intelligence agencies back in 1975, we were not totally shocked to see the names – Jane Fonda, Tom Hayden, Martin Luther King, Bobby Seale, Muhammad Ali and Tom Wicker, to name just a few of the over 1,600 people [who were on an NSA watch list]. There were many names we did not recognize – criminals, drug dealers, even old-line suspected communists. But there were two names we never saw, because they were never given to the Church Committee: Sens. Frank Church and Howard Baker. New documents just made public by NSA and George Washington University’s National Security Archive now reveal that Church, the chairman of the investigative committee and Baker, a member of both the Watergate and Intelligence Committees, were both put on the watch list and their communications were monitored…If NSA had revealed such explosive information in 1975, all hell would have broken loose. So they chose to lie. There were no whistle blowers then, no voices within the Ford administration that revealed such secrets.”

It’s quite convenient that, every time one of these revelations occurs, it’s treated as a unique circumstance. A few dots may be connected, but the overall story dies.

This latest 2015 piece about NSA rolling up members of Congress, as the agency spied on Israeli leaders—it’s not breaking; it’s one instance in a long history.

Anyone with a few brain cells working can see the pattern: the NSA and the CIA are holding a cloud of threat over the Congress. They’ve gathered many bits of information, some of which would be embarrassing, to say the least, if they were released.

It’s usually called blackmail, extortion, shakedown. Because that’s what it is.

Unless you want to believe that these intelligence agencies, having assembled large dossiers on members of Congress for decades, are benign in their intent. They’re just making sure Representatives and Senators are keeping their daily appointments, having their dry cleaning delivered on time, and maintaining their magazine and newspaper subscriptions.

Yes, that must be it. The NSA and CIA are just a Jeeves service. They’re meta-butlers and meta-cooks and meta-delivery people. It’s all good. People helping people. Inter-Branch cooperation.


power outside the matrix


Better to believe that, because if the sinister implications are true, then what can Congress do about them? Already sold out to lobbyists and corporations, and on top of that they’re under the thumb of spying agencies? They’re captive to extortionists who have hundred-billion-dollar budgets?

“Sir, I assume you’ll be voting for the war, yes? Just trying to get a feel for your position. Once in a while, these Presidential wars do require Congressional approval. And while we’re at it, what about the Trade Treaty? It’s vital for National Security, wouldn’t you say?”

Just a wink and a nudge. Why use gross tactics? Especially when you have phone conversations mentioning the names of one or two pedophiles, follow-up photos of a private party, and so on. Easy does it. We’re all in this together.

The Constitution? Separation of powers? Never heard of it. Must have been some ancient piece of paper heralded in a bygone naive era.

“Hi, Senator. Regards to your wife. How are the kids doing at college?”

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Black budget ops

Black budget ops, Hillary emails, meta-crimes

by Jon Rappoport

August 26, 2015

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

Suppose masters of surveillance know exactly what emails have been scrubbed from Hillary Clinton’s private server? Suppose they’ve had a complete collection of all her emails all along?

Suppose masters of surveillance have an enormous database of emails and phone calls from every current presidential candidate and his/her staff?

Suppose the actual details of Benghazi, Fast&Furious, the IRS-Tea Party scandal, and numerous other events are in the hands of these surveillance masters?

Suppose the secret negotiations surrounding several trade treaties, including the TPP, are known, in great detail, by the masters of surveillance?

Suppose this is not science fiction.

Suppose some of this information can (or has been) turned into blackmail operations; or conversely, has been concealed to protect the guilty?

Suppose, for example, the hundreds of millions of emails and phone calls generated within the European Union bureaucracy are in the hands of these surveillance masters.

The old saw, “Information is power,” takes on new meaning.

So does, “We’re not in Kansas anymore.”

It’s an open secret that propaganda ops contain the component of analyzing the reactions of the population to the propaganda messages. That has been true for a very long time. But now, the ability to judge and parse those reactions is increased a thousand-fold, because of surveillance.

This is a new age.

The Surveillance State has created an apparatus whose implications are staggering. It’s a different world now. And sometimes it takes a writer of fiction to flesh out the larger landscape.

Brad Thor’s novel, Black List (twitter), posits the existence of a monster corporation, ATS, that stands along side the NSA in collecting information on every move we make. ATS’ intelligence-gathering capability is unmatched anywhere in the world.

On pages 117-118 of Black List, Thor makes a stunning inference that, on reflection, is as obvious as the fingers on your hand:

“For years ATS had been using its technological superiority to conduct massive insider trading. Since the early 1980s, the company had spied on anyone and everyone in the financial world. They listened in on phone calls, intercepted faxes, and evolved right along with the technology, hacking internal computer networks and e-mail accounts. They created mountains of ‘black dollars’ for themselves, which they washed through various programs they were running under secret contract, far from the prying eyes of financial regulators.

“Those black dollars were invested into hard assets around the world, as well as in the stock market, through sham, offshore corporations. They also funneled the money into reams of promising R&D projects, which eventually would be turned around and sold to the Pentagon or the CIA.

“In short, ATS had created its own license to print money and had assured itself a place beyond examination or reproach.”

In real life, whether the prime criminal source is one monster corporation or a consortium of companies, or elite banks, or the NSA itself, the outcome would be the same.

It would be as Thor describes it.

We think about total surveillance as being directed at private citizens, but the capability has unlimited payoffs when it targets financial markets and the people who have intimate knowledge of them.

“Total security awareness” programs of surveillance are ideal spying ops in the financial arena, designed to suck up millions of bits of inside information, then utilizing them to make investments and suck up billions (trillions?) of dollars.

It gives new meaning to “the rich get richer.”

Taking the overall scheme to another level, consider this: those same heavy hitters who have unfettered access to financial information can also choose, at opportune moments, to expose certain scandals and crimes (not their own, of course).

In this way, they can, at their whim, cripple governments, banks, and corporations. They can cripple investment houses, insurance companies, and hedge funds. Or, alternatively, they can merely blackmail these organizations.

We think we know how scandals are exposed by the press, but actually we don’t. Tips are given to people who give them to other people. Usually, the first clue that starts the ball rolling comes from a source who remains in the shadows.

What we are talking about here is the creation and managing of realities on all sides, including the choice of when and where and how to provide a glimpse of a crime or scandal.

It’s likely that the probe Ron Paul had been pushing—audit the Federal Reserve—has already been done by those who control unlimited global surveillance. They already know far more than any Congressional investigation will uncover. If they know the deepest truths, they can use them to blackmail, manipulate, and control the Fed itself.

The information matrix can be tapped into and plumbed, and it can also be used to dispense choice clusters of data that end up constituting the media reality of painted pictures which, every day, tell billions of people “what’s news.”

In this global-surveillance world, we need to ask new questions and think along different lines now.

For example, how long before the mortgage-derivative crisis hit did the Masters of Surveillance know, from spying on bank records, that insupportable debt was accumulating at a lethal pace? What did they do with that information?

When did they know that at least a trillion dollars was missing from Pentagon accounting books (as Donald Rumsfeld eventually publicly admitted on September 10, 2001), and what did they do with that information?

Did they discover where billions of dollars, in cash, shipped to post-war Iraq, disappeared to?

When did they know the details of the Libor rate-fixing scandal? Press reports indicate that Barclays was trying to rig interest rates as early as January 2005.

Have they tracked, in detail, the men responsible for recruiting hired mercenaries and terrorists, who eventually wound up in Syria pretending to be an authentic rebel force?

Have they discovered the truth about how close or how far away Iran is from producing a nuclear weapon?

Have they collected detailed accounts of the most private plans of Bilderberg, CFR, and Trilateral Commission leaders?


power outside the matrix


For global surveillance kings, what we think of as the future is, in many respects the present and the past.

It’s a new world. These overseers of universal information-detection can enter and probe the most secret caches of data, collect, collate, cross reference, and assemble them into vital bottom-lines. By comparison, an operation like Wikileaks is an old Model-T Ford puttering down a country road, and Julian Assange, reviled as a terrorist, is a mere piker.

Previously, we thought we needed to look over the shoulders of the men who were committing major crimes out of public view. But now, if we want to be up to date, we also have to factor in the men who are spying on those criminals, who are gathering up those secrets and using them to commit their own brand of meta-crime.

And in the financial arena, that means we think of Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan as perpetrators, yes, but we also think about the men who already know everything about GS and Morgan, and are using this knowledge to steal sums that might make GS and Morgan blush with envy.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Australia: human experiment in a bottle

Australia: human experiment in a bottle

Coming to your country…yesterday

by Jon Rappoport

July 6, 2015

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)

“Imagine a vast island. Once a colony, it now rules itself. That, at least, is its claim. But foreign money and ownership bleed in. And on the other side of the world, it has a mighty military partner dedicated to spying and war. This partner says, ‘Do everything you can to accumulate as much information as you can on every one of your citizens. We will help. We will accomplish this together.’ The island is called one of the wealthiest countries in the world, but its poverty rate is rising, its government debt is 20% of GDP, and household debts are extraordinary. The face behind the mask shows suggestions that the party is coming to an end.” (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)

The kind of top-down control that exists in Australia is unique in developed nations, because of two factors: geography and population.

Think about it this way. The US and Australia are comparable in size. US: 3.7 million square miles. Australia: 2.99 million square miles.

But population? The US: 318 million people. Australia: 24 million people.

There are 10 million people in Los Angeles County alone. 38 million people live in California.

Consider this quote about surveillance in Australia, from the Sydney Morning Herald, 6/7/2013, “Australians at risk in US electronic surveillance program”:

“During criminal and revenue investigations in 2011-12, government agencies accessed private data and internet logs more than 300,000 times.”

And that’s the access we know about. In fact, the Herald points out, “Under Australian law state, territory and federal law enforcement authorities can access a variety of ‘non-content’ data from internet-related companies, like Telstra, Optus and Google, without a warrant.

“Data access is authorised by senior police officers or government officials, rather than by a judicial warrant.”

No warrant.

Government requests for private information in Australia jump about 20% per year.

And then there is the sharing of private information, done in conjunction with the US National Security Agency (NSA).

Spying “density” per capita in Australia may exceed that of any other nation.

Along with surveillance, of course, comes control. Recently, Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott (who once refused to vaccinate his daughters with the Gardasil shot) decided that any family receiving forms of government $$ aid would have that aid canceled, if they refused to vaccinate their children according to the official schedule. Soon after, he removed the religious exemption as well.

Now we come to globalization. Globalisation Guide.org spells out some of the effects in, “What does globalisation mean to Australia?”:

“Australian corporations participate in the oppression of workers and peasants in poor countries in Asia. Australian mining and forestry companies are involved in extracting wealth from countries such as Papua New Guinea, Irian Jaya and Indonesia, sometimes relying on military support to suppress local opposition. The Australian support for trade liberalisation, particularly in agriculture, has been used to open up markets in poor countries where Australia’s commodity exports put local subsistence farmers out of work. Australia has opened its own markets to goods made in countries that allow child labour, or forbid the formation of free trade unions. The Australian government has opposed efforts to include environmental and labour protection clauses in World Trade Organisation agreements. Australia places few restrictions on the operations of transnational organisations [corporations], which take wealth from the country, and are not managed in the interests of Australia.”

The result in Australia? The gap between the rich and poor grows.

And with such a small population, the Surveillance State has extraordinary access to the private information of those who see the big picture of Globalism clearly and are profoundly dissatisfied.

Add another factor: Pine Gap, the glittering jewel in the crown of international NSA spying. This joint US-Australia institution must be protected and maintained at all costs—and the Australian population must therefore be kept under control. No rebellions permitted.

Experiment in a bottle. Corral the whole population of Australia, spy on them non-stop, inject them with toxic debilitating vaccines, and keep them in a state of ignorance about what is happening to them and their nation.

Call this control right-wing, left-wing, argue about which leader should be elected—distract the population while cementing top-down power.

You are looking at the reality created for the world and its own population to see, versus the reality behind the front.

This is the pattern for every nation—but in the case of Australia, it looks benign and encouraging, because there is so much land and there are so few people.


The Matrix Revealed


The Australian government-money-corporate-military nexus has a much different idea about a thing called freedom and what it means. For them it is a useful illusion, floated to obscure the accumulating takeover of the population.

The people themselves appear to be in no mood for rebellion. They stare at the illusion, as clouds gather.

There is enough land in Australia for several dozen countries, but the psychology of unity and oneness prevails, as if the comfort of believing in a national character will provide sufficient sustenance.

In fact, decentralization of power should be the watchword. Independence, liberty, and decentralization were once major themes. But they have faded like posters on an old wall.

The globalized and spied-upon country is captive, an island in the stream.

When that point is reached, it is only individuals who can wake up the masses. As improbable as this sounds, it is true, as it has always been.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.