UFO Disclosure: the insider game of “reliable sources”

UFO disclosure: the insider game of “reliable sources”

by Jon Rappoport

January 2, 2018

(UFO archive, here)

In the current wave of UFO disclosures, the press (in particular, the New York Times) has decided to use Luis Elizondo, a career intelligence case officer, as its main source.

This choice reveals a time-honored strategy of elite news operations: cherry-pick who is reliable and who isn’t.

Of course, the press presents its case as flowing FROM the source. But that’s not true, because reporters and editors could have used other “reliable sources” to tell a different, or even contradictory, story.

Everything depends on who, at the moment, is pumped up and ushered on to center stage, and tagged as “reliable.”

I’m not saying Mr. Elizondo is telling lies from wall to wall. But, for example, where was the Times when reports began to emerge of UFOs appearing at a missile base in Montana (1967) and shutting down launch-capability? There were a number of professional military observers at the time. They could have been deemed “reliable sources,” but they weren’t. For decades, this event has been suppressed or downplayed by the mainstream press.

“Well, we did look into it, but we concluded there just wasn’t enough there. We didn’t go with the piece because the confirmation was thin.” That’s a frequent excuse. Often, it doesn’t hold water. It reflects an arbitrary decision to ignore a valid account.

This is how the game is played.

“Reliable source” can be managed, on a case by case basis.

“Let’s see. We can imply the steep rise in autism is the result of more careful monitoring of cases, or a genetic problem, or the rapid expansion of the CDC vaccination schedule. Let’s do a piece on genetics. Who can we tap for comments? Round up the usual list of expert sources and get quotes. ‘New research suggests a stronger link to genes than previously supposed.’ That’ll work…”

When I was writing my first book, AIDS INC., Scandal of the Century, in 1987, I decided to look into the widely promoted notion that HIV had spread to humans, in Africa, through contact with green monkeys. When the US press wants to promote a “new disease,” they inevitably go to far-off places around the globe for their “origin story.” The last time I looked, no new epidemic has ever begun in Brooklyn. I called a prominent AIDS researcher at Harvard. Without pause, he told me the green monkey theory had no evidence to support it. Well, obviously, the press hadn’t used him as a “reliable source.” They might use him to comment on other matters, but not this one—because “green monkey” was the preferred scenario for the moment.

On the UFO front, the Times could have jumped with both feet into Steven Greer’s Disclosure Project years ago (twitter). Greer had scores of military and intelligence officers who were testifying to all sorts of UFO contact. But back then, the story was verboten. So the sources were ignored.

Sometimes, the graduation from nonsense-story to breaking news isn’t the decision of a major press outlet. The newspaper or broadcast network takes its cue from a “higher authority.” The CIA or the Pentagon, for example. Or from an anonymous heavy hitter who will never be revealed. Depending on the topic of the story, the heavy hitter could exist within the core of the Bilderberg Group, the Trilateral Commission, the Vatican, the upper reaches of the “banking community” (a Rothschild front man), etc.

This is the “green light” phenomenon. What was once a studiously ignored piece suddenly turns into an imperative to publish. The chosen news outlets jump into action.

The green light can also click through indirect means. Consider the name, Jim Semivan. He is on Tom DeLonge’s team at the newly formed To the Stars Academy, the group which includes Mr. Elizondo, mentioned above. Here is a thumbnail bio of Mr. Semivan from Simon & Schuster publishers: “Jim retired in 2007 after a 25-year career in the Central Intelligence Agency’s National Clandestine Service. At the time of his retirement he was a member of the CIA’s Senior Intelligence Service. Jim served multiple overseas and domestic tours along with senior management positions in CIA headquarters. He is the recipient of the Agency’s Career Intelligence Medal.”

Semivan’s emergence in UFO disclosure activities would alert the New York Times that it should pay attention to any information coming out of To the Stars Academy. Semivan is more than a witness or a researcher. He’s a high-level man connected to the intelligence community. If he backs up a story, it’s “official.”

I’ll give you a name: Richard Dolan. Dolan is the author of books on UFOs, and he is a publisher in the same field. A highly intelligent observer, when he makes inferences from data he explains his reasons. He possesses a formidable knowledge of UFO incidents over the course of decades. Major media outlets could go to him as a direct source for articles, or as a guide who could point them to credible stories. But that doesn’t happen.

Why? Because Mr. Dolan could unleash “too much information.” He could open up too many cans of worms. And he doesn’t have an official position in government or corporate circles.

He is reliable, but not in the media sense of the word. He could give, say, the reporters at the New York Times far more help than their editors could—but that doesn’t matter.

What matters to the Times and other mainstream outlets is the agenda of the moment. And who will bolster that agenda.

Why isn’t long-time UFO researcher Grant Cameron writing op-ed pieces for the Times? He has a very interesting take on how various UFO spokespeople have been used by the military-intelligence complex. Alas, Cameron makes too much sense. He goes too deep. So instead, a Times reporter writes a human-interest story about his father. The father was a veteran UFO watcher, who sadly died before the US government “admitted UFOs exist,” a couple of weeks ago.

At any time over the past 40 years, the Times could have assigned a couple of reporters the job of assembling a history of bullet-proof UFO-encounter stories. For a major article. An article that would have settled the issue once and for all: UFOs, whatever they are, exist, and they exhibit extraordinary capabilities.

But “it wasn’t time.”

Now, it is.

The green light is on. But it is only glowing for certain people, and for chosen news companies.

The Reliable Ones.

Therefore, when the Times, or a comparable media operation, discloses UFO revelations, the stories—accurate or not—reflect a purpose that is hidden.

That purpose is never the unvarnished and complete truth.

Over the past 35 years, working as a reporter, I’ve spoken off-the-record with a number of mainstream journalists. They readily admit to making “partial disclosures,” otherwise known as limited hangouts. They explain this as “sticking to the facts at hand.” But that’s not true. They also admit their editors keep them from digging deeper on a story.

Digging deeper would, of course, expose unpleasant scandals the public shouldn’t be aware of. And in the process, people who are deemed unreliable sources would be vindicated. If THAT happened, the whole proprietary media egg would crack.

The public would understand, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that big media cherry-pick their sources, and mainstream news is a stage play.

An acid test: If the New York Times gave the first five pages of their paper to a few independent UFO reporters for a week, those reporters could write a slew of hard-hitting factual pieces that would shake the foundations of knowledge about UFOs. Sales of the paper would skyrocket, and names like Luis Elizondo and Jim Semivan would fade far into the background. The public would realize that verified sightings of UFOs go back at least 50 years. And that would be just the beginning of actual Disclosure.

“Reliable source” is a pliable term. In the media landscape, it implies that editors and publishers are in charge of defining it, at any given moment, to suit their agenda.

If tomorrow, for example, the Times decided that the famous Lockheed Skunkworks, located in the desert (Palmdale, California), was their primary target, as in—what have they been building out there for years?—a whole new raft of reliable sources would come into play overnight. Setting their hounds loose, with no restrictive deadline, the Times might experience what it’s like to operate as an actual news outlet.

They would eventually penetrate many cover stories. What would they discover?

The former director of the elite Skunkworks, Ben Rich, before his death, is reported to have said (UCLA School of Engineering speech, March 23, 1993): “We now know how to travel to the stars…There are many in the intelligence community who would like to see this stay in the black and not see the light of day.”

Now there’s a potential source—an insider’s insider. Did Ben Rich say that? Is it true? If it’s true, how did Lockheed develop/obtain the technology?

Why not pursue that lead and run it down?

“Well, we don’t like to rely on dead sources, especially when they make bizarre claims.”

Who says the claim is bizarre? The CIA? The Pentagon? Lockheed?

They’re automatically listed as reliable?

Is “hard to believe, hard to fathom” an unimpeachable standard for barring investigations without further thought?

Wasn’t, for instance, the whole CIA MKULTRA mind control program bizarre and hard to believe, before it was exposed?

Thousands of events and programs are impossible, before they turn out to have happened.

The idea that the New York Times, the number one media outlet in the world, isn’t devoted to the truth—that idea would be very hard for many people to believe; until it’s shown to be factual.

“Hi, I’m major media. I depend on reliable sources. I decide who is reliable and who isn’t, on any given day of the week. I use these sources to construct and shape Reality for the masses. That’s my job. I spend gargantuan amounts of money in this effort. After all, inventing Reality is an awesome mandate. You can’t fool around with that. You must be convincing. If I tried and failed, the consequences would be devastating. A few billion people would see holes in Reality Itself. This is not permitted to happen.”

Ah, but it is happening. Deepest apologies.

The Reality Manufacturing Company is at DEFCON 1, red lights are blinking, and systems are going down.


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Current UFO disclosures and the incredible edible New York Times

Current UFO disclosures and the incredible edible New York Times

by Jon Rappoport

December 31, 2017

(UFO archive, here)

The first thing to understand is that the New York Times broke the latest UFO story.

The story about: a secret Pentagon UFO research group; a US fighter jet that encountered a UFO off the coast of San Diego; and the recovery of “UFO metals.”

The Times broke the story, and then it quickly went global.

On the subject of UFOs, that never happens.

But it did.

Furthermore, the Times expressed no doubts about the information it was disclosing. There wasn’t the usual “he said, he said” treatment.

No detractors and harsh critics were quoted. This was a straight-from-the-Pentagon to the Times pipeline.

The Times story had all the earmarks of a government gift, not a leak.

This, too, never happens.

But it did.

The conclusion: the Pentagon wanted this story to come to light. Someone high up in the Pentagon, or someone outside the Pentagon, with major clout, gave the green light to the Times. He assured the Times the story was real. Perhaps he even gave an “order” to release the information.

As discussion and vetting of the UFO story occurred at the Times, before they went to print, the overriding and decisive factor was: “somebody big wants this to move forward.” Case closed.

But we shouldn’t assume the motive for disclosure was, at the top, generous and benign and innocent. Because we’re talking about the Pentagon and the CIA, the people who always have a concealed agenda.

If they give the public a few bread crumbs, or even a steak, there is a 15-course meal behind that, and the meal is never served.

Long-time UFO researcher, Grant Cameron, has pointed out that the American strategy for hiding secrets (for decades) has been: partial disclosure. Periodically, now and then—“Here’s a small piece. Chew on it.”

This is the US government approach.

Except—the recent Pentagon offerings haven’t been leaked via some small-press book published in a print shop—they’ve been shot out of information-guns directly to the most prestigious mainstream news outlet in the world: the New York Times.

That’s different. Very different.

And just now, the Times has published two more UFO articles. The first, by senior reporter Dan Barry, is headlined: “Dad Believed in UFOs. Turns Out He Wasn’t Alone.” Barry’s father was a veteran UFO watcher. He died before the Pentagon finally admitted UFOs are real. That’s the hook of the article. It’s a human interest piece. And it’s overwhelmingly positive re UFOs. Again, you don’t see this sort of thing from the Times—not ever—but there it is.

“UFOs: Is This All There Is?” is the second Times piece, by Dennis Overbye. It’s a soft back and forth: something is happening in the sky but we don’t know what it is. No harsh naysaying. No nastiness.

Both of these pieces lend support to the original Times blockbuster about the secret Pentagon UFO program.

All this could very well mean that what is being hidden, now, is much larger than what has been hidden in the past. For example, new technological discoveries and advances have been made in the areas of propulsion systems and energy production, beside which the old discoveries pale by comparison.

In that case, the latest partial disclosures needed to be stronger, in terms of their impact. Impact as diversion from the deeper truth.

And the NY Times would carry the ball.

Who was the paper’s main source for the breaking UFO disclosure? Luis Elizondo, the man who headed up the Pentagon UFO program, until he resigned. Elizondo is now part of rock musician Tom Delonge’s team at his newly formed To the Stars Academy. Elizondo’s new association hardly qualifies as a “good source” for an outlet like the Times.

Further, anyone who reads Elizondo’s bio at the Academy website would have reason to pause for thought:

“Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Luis conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East.”

Excuse me? The number one mainstream news operation on the planet accepts what Elizondo is saying at face value? On the verboten subject of UFOs? When everyone knows career intelligence officers are trained to lie at the drop of a hat?

The Times has suddenly become a “UFO site?”

Having received Elizondo’s assertions, the Times would have gone to its long-time sources at the Pentagon, and the Word would have come back: this is rock solid fact. Which, again, tells you the Pentagon wanted this story to be published. Strongly wanted.

If Donald Trump holds a water bottle in two hands and puckers his lips as he takes a sip, the Times would wonder aloud whether he was suffering from Alzheimer’s. But all of a sudden, on the topic of UFOs, the story the Times is being fed is honest and accurate, and there is no need to consult the usual experts who provide “balanced” criticism and “negative reactions.”

One conclusion: the Times is prepared to publish more UFO stories. Quotes from other military/intelligence sources. Unless the blowback from rival news outlets is too severe.

Another inference: the Times already has other videos of UFOs and other “irrefutable” interviews in the can.

Whatever they eventually publish, no matter how shocking, it will be a very, very small fragment of what the government (and those who control the government) is hiding.

If, five years ago, you polled the most competent and knowledgeable independent UFO researchers, and asked them whether they thought the New York Times would ever publish a major positive UFO story, who among them would have predicted what we are seeing now?

Finally, this could now happen: someone at the Times, a senior editor, or even the publisher, goes to the Pentagon and says, “Look, we’re begging off. We’ve done our job. We did what you told us to do. But now, other news operations are going to have to carry the freight. We can’t afford to incur a stain on our reputation. We broke the barrier. You’ll have to find other people to move your story forward…”

But the Times will forever be remembered as the first—they took their marching orders and delivered. They fronted for, and sold, a limited hangout, against all odds.


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Will the next UFO disclosure be “biological threats from outer space?”

Will the next UFO disclosure be “biological threats from outer space?”

by Jon Rappoport

December 26, 2017

(UFO archive, here)

That may sound like a misguided question. But let’s look at Tom DeLonge’s company, currently acting as a conduit for new UFO revelations.

DeLonge (twitter), a famous musician (Blink-182, Angels and Airwaves) has surrounded himself with high-level spooks from the CIA and the military, in his new venture, To The Stars Academy (twitter).

One of his lead collaborators is Luis Elizondo, who was the Pentagon chief of a secret program (2007-2012) to study and explore UFO activity. Elizondo is now the point man for media, explaining the breaking news about a 2004 US military sighting of a UFO, and subsequent failed attempts to analyze materials from UFOs. He’s also hinting that alien UFOs are a potential threat to our safety, a threat we can’t ignore.

Every major press outlet in the world, starting with the NY Times, is covering this story.

Who are the players on De Longe’s team? Buckle up. The following quotes are from the Academy’s site:

Jim Semivan—“Mr. Semivan retired from the Central Intelligence Agency’s Directorate of Operations after 25 years as an operations officer, both overseas and domestically.”

Hal Puthoff—“Dr. Puthoff’s professional background spans more than five decades of research at General Electric, Sperry, the National Security Agency (NSA), Stanford University and SRI International. Dr. Puthoff regularly advises NASA, the Department of Defense and intelligence communities…”

Luis Elizondo—“Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Luis conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East.”

Chris Mellon—“He served 20 years in the federal government, including as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Intelligence in the Clinton and Bush Administrations.”

Paul Rapp—“His past honors include a Certificate of Commendation from the Central Intelligence Agency for ‘significant contributions to the mission of the Office of Research and Development’.” (Note: This office, ORD, was where the CIA’s MKULTRA mind control program secretly landed, in 1962, after it purportedly ended.)

Norm Kahn—“Dr. Kahn had over a 30-year career with the Central Intelligence Agency…”

Getting the picture?

That’s quite a roll call of military and intelligence insiders. Did DeLonge recruit them, or did they covertly recruit him, viewing him as a sincere, but rather clueless front man they could use for their own purposes?

But let’s go one layer deeper with a few of these names on Tom DeLonge’s team at the To the Stars Academy.

Dr. Norm Kahn’s career with the CIA “culminat[ed] in his development and direction of the Intelligence Community’s Counter-Biological Weapons Program.”

Dr. Rapp “is a Professor of Military and Emergency Medicine at the Uniformed Services University.”

Dr. Garry Nolan, another Academy advisor, “is the Rachford and Carlota A. Harris Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine…He holds a B.S. in genetics from Cornell University, a Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University.”

Luis Elizondo’s “academic background includes Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, with research experience in tropical diseases.”

And finally, another Academy team member, Dr. Adele Gilpin, “is a scientist with biomedical academic and research experience as well as an active, licensed, attorney.”

Why are all these medical people on board, along with intelligence and military players? Microbiology, parasitology, immunology, genetics, biological weapons? What do these fields have to do with UFOs?

It doesn’t take a great deal of imagination to come up with a few answers. Military and intelligence and microbiological people, working together on UFO scenarios, could easily concoct “threat assessments” focusing on “unique viruses coming to Earth from space.” Via drift, or even through “aliens” visiting from afar.

I say “threat assessments,” because that is how these people think and how they spin.

Don’t be too surprised if you hear language like this emerge:

“We must prepare for all eventualities. After all, if we aren’t alone in the universe, we could be subject to life forms at the micro level we aren’t ready for, and to which we have no natural immunity…”

When your professional background is inventing enemies, there are no limits to the scenarios you’ll dream up.

Suppose we soon hear this: “Dr. X has suggested the need for extensive research on possible vaccines against a whole range of unknown viral species from outer space…”

The CEO of Merck would sit up straight and grab the phone. He would want to talk to his contact at the Defense Department. He smells a new government contract.

A few big shots at the US Centers for Disease Control would huddle in a meeting. How can they get in on the action? Perhaps they can find an astrobiologist who’ll claim “the possibility of human disease originating in space has been considered for many years. We’ve always been puzzled by the genetic makeup of certain viruses. When you consider that components involved in the formation of Earth itself could have come from distant space, these components certainly could have carried microbes with them…”

Yes, that would be a start. “And if, in fact, we have had ‘visitors,’ wouldn’t they carry their own set of unique viruses?”

Here is an actual news story from gizmodo.com (6/22/15), “Why Scientists Have Been Scared of Space Germs for Almost 50 Years”:

“The 1967 Outer Space Treaty was one of the few things the U.S. and the Soviet Union managed to agree on at the height of the Cold War. Among other things, it forbid both nations from bringing space microbes back to Earth, or spreading Earth germs to other planets.”

“Mostly, they [scientists] worry about single-celled, microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, some fungi, and viruses – or whatever the alien version of single-celled life looks like. We know for certain that bacteria and viruses can survive exposure to the harsh conditions of space long enough to hitch a ride to someplace more hospitable [like Earth].”

“Once they [Apollo mission personnel] returned to Earth, the crews went into immediate quarantine. First they lived in a mobile isolation unit on the aircraft carrier that recovered the landing capsule, then in an aircraft set up for isolation, and finally in a special quarantine unit at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. They stayed there for three weeks, while NASA doctors performed tests and watched for any signs of illness that might indicate an alien infection.”

Perfect. The intelligence and military and medical people at DeLonge’s Academy could cook up “space-virus” scenarios in a heartbeat. And with a series of press statements, they could pitch a threat assessment to the press. They already own a direct pipeline to the NY Times, which tells you they have an official green light to move forward.

We’re looking at something extraordinary here. A rock musician, who’s been intensely interested in UFOs for years, starts his own Academy, and he’s instantly surrounded by important CIA and Pentagon and medical players. They have access to the most powerful press outlets.

They’ve already sold a story about military contact with a UFO, and another story about pieces from a UFO that resist all attempts at analysis. It was a remarkably easy sale. Poof. No problem.

Why not hoist up the flag on bio-threats from deep space? Carefully craft the language. Peddle that tale, too.

There are lots of payoffs. Raise the public level of fear. Always a goal when the CIA and the Pentagon are in the game. Stimulate government contracts (big money) for new medical research. Use this research as a cover for yet more (illegal) work on offensive bio-warfare programs. Hell, if they’re going to go that far, why not claim the Russians have already isolated viruses from space and are developing super bio-weapons—and you have the makings of a brand new shiny Cold War.

Too wild to be believed? No, not really. When you own the basic narrative, and you have good propagandists at your disposal, the sky’s the limit.

Or in this case, space.

It may be the Final Frontier of exploration, but it’s also the frontier of sheer fabrication.

“Are you ready, boys? All right, let’s go. Work it. Work the new virus-from-space scenario. This is a big one. All hands on deck. Sell it. Sell that jive. The New York Times is panting for more. Give it to them.”

There are rumblings in Congress about resurrecting the Reagan Star Wars plan to build space weapons, which would intercept enemy nuclear missiles. Why not piggy-back a staggeringly expensive program to install “virus detectors” in space, to alert the government to “incoming microbes” from Out There—or from purported Russian “bio-attacks?”

“They’d never be able to sell that idea.”

Really? Given enough time and propaganda, and given control of the basic narrative, government scientists can sell almost anything.

For decades, they’ve been selling the concept and practice of taking babies and toddlers, who possess almost no immune systems of their own, and injecting them with brews of toxic chemicals and microbes—known as vaccination—in order to stimulate and produce immunity in those non-existent immune systems.

Back in the mid-1990s, a whole brew of hysteria was whipped up about the Hot Zone. The thesis went this way: Because of the ease of global travel, all sorts of dangerous viruses, buried for centuries in Africa and the rainforests of South America, were going to come to the West and kill untold numbers of people, who had developed no natural immunity to them. Books and articles and films about this threat appeared.

Well, the next great Hot Zone story would be Space.

And To the Stars Academy has the right people on board to promote and hustle it.

Plus, on the side, DeLonge’s Academy can always use all those medical experts to analyze an alien ET body that suddenly pops up in a locker at Area 51.


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

What about the UFO metal no one can analyze?

What about the “UFO metal” that no one can analyze?

Robert Bigelow, the “metal man” for UFO disclosure

by Jon Rappoport

December 24, 2017

(UFO archive, here)

This is a story out of a 1950s pulp science fiction novel. A story that purports to be quite real, now.

Las Vegas billionaire, Robert Bigelow, has been identified as a major player in the secret Pentagon UFO research group (2007-2012), exposed in the New York Times a few days ago.

Here are press reports about Bigelow, just to give you a few facts about the man, and the exotic flavor of this incredible tale—

Gizmodo (12/16/17): “The Pentagon quietly ran a $22 million program to study unidentified flying objects from 2008 to 2012 at the behest of former Senator Harry Reid, the New York Times reported on Saturday…”

“The unclassified but secretive Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program was funded $22 million from 2008 to 2011, with the vast majority of the funding going to Bigelow Airspace. That’s a company conveniently owned by one of Reid’s friends and donors, Robert Bigelow…That $22 million enabled contractors to build a low-key Nevada warehouse for what they claimed was unidentified artifacts obtained from UFOs, as well as compile witness accounts…”

New York Times: “Under Mr. Bigelow’s direction, the company modified buildings in Las Vegas for the storage of metal alloys and other materials that Mr. Elizondo [who headed up the secret Pentagon UFO program] and program contractors said had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena…”

Bigelow made his fortune in commercial and residential real estate. He’s a pal of Senator Harry Reid. And he gets to store the most important materials ever discovered in his warehouse. No problem.

We aren’t told whether the UFO materials were analyzed under Bigelow’s direction (no one has been able to discover what these metals are, what they’re made of), but if most or all of the $22 million Pentagon program went to him, it’s possible this real estate tycoon was permitted to supervise, or sub-contract, the analysis of the UFO metals.

Really?

The UK Express is rightly blown away: “METAL and other materials allegedly recovered from UFOs was stored in converted buildings in Las Vegas under a US Government-funded program, it has astonishingly been claimed.”

“The material, that was said to be ‘unknown to science’ following tests, was stored in buildings modified by a private aerospace company [Bigelow] which was paid huge amounts of money by the US Department of Defense to research the phenomenon and look after the ‘metal alloys’, according to reports.”

“However, no images have surfaced of the alleged material, nor have any details of where it was found, or any reports of tests carried out on it.”

“In May Mr Bigelow stunned the world by declaring during an interview with primetime CBS current affairs show 60 Minutes, that believes that intelligent aliens are secretly living on Earth, and the government knows about it.” [A convenient interview, preparing the public for shocking UFO disclosures that were to come six months later.]

“It is now claimed that under his [Bigelow’s] direction buildings at the company headquarters were ‘modified’ to allow the storage of the materials [from UFOs].”

“No further details have been released at this stage about where they [the UFO materials] were found, how many there are, or what happened to them.”

“It also does not appear any official reports on the materials have been released, but it is claimed that research was also carried out on people who came into contact with the material to see if there were any effects on them.”

“Express.co.uk has approached Mr Bigelow through Bigelow aerospace to try to find out what happened to the material, if he still has it, and whether it can be photographed, or any reports on studies on it can be released.”

“We have also contacted Mr Reid, and Mr Elizondo through To The Stars Academy, asking if they know what became of the materials.”

“We await responses from all three.”

Las Vegas Review Journal: “The [NY] Times’ investigation unearthed contracts showing the [Pentagon UFO] program received $22 million in federal funding between 2008 and 2011. The money went to Bigelow Aerospace, the North Las Vegas-based company founded in 1999 by Robert Bigelow, owner of the Budget Suites of America hotel chain and one of Reid’s longtime friends and campaign contributors.”

“Bigelow’s company modified buildings in Las Vegas for the storage of metal alloys and other materials reportedly recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena, the Times said.”

OK, those are a few of the press reports.

Question: Should we really believe metals from UFOs have been recovered, analyzed, and stored at Bigelow’s warehouse—rather than at a super-secret military lab in a bunker?

Should we believe these materials actually come from UFOs? How were they obtained? A pilot in a US fighter jet operated a robot arm that reached out into space and scraped off a few samples from a streaking or hovering alien craft? A UFO crashed, and military personnel rushed to the scene, confiscated the craft wreckage, transported it to Area 51…and years later, a few soldiers drove metal samples to Bigelow’s warehouse and dropped them off for safe-keeping?

Bigelow’s low-profile warehouse has the kind of security that could protect the most important materials ever discovered by humans?

Well, there is a story. The story has been told. It’s been fed to the mainstream press, and the press has run with it—including the New York Times. The man who headed up the 2007-2012 secret Pentagon program, Luis Elizondo, is agreeing with the story.

One lesson: When you own and control the narrative, and when the press is bending over backwards to give you access, you can sell almost anything. In this case, based on no physical evidence, you can say UFO metals have been recovered and no one can figure out what they are, and a rich pal of a US senator has been storing them in his warehouse. No problem. And the man who confirms the story, Mr. Elizondo, who worked for the Pentagon, is now a media point man for something called To the Stars Academy, founded by a rock musician who has a commitment to discovering “the truth about UFOs.” Wow.

I’ve got condos on the dark side of the moon. Cash only for interested buyers.

Here is my backgrounder on a few vital basics of propaganda, which means information control, which means mind control. This is the game in the Information Age. This is how it’s done.

Who owns the UFO narrative?

ONE: 1947-2017 (seven long decades)—“WHAT ARE THE CIA AND THE PENTAGON HIDING ABOUT UFOs? WE DEMAND THEY COME CLEAN AND OPEN THEIR FILES AND TELL THE TRUTH AND REVEAL THE SECRETS! STOP LYING AND STALLING.”

TWO: 2017—“HI, WE’RE THE PENTAGON. HERE ARE SECRETS ABOUT UFOs AND THE PROGRAM NO ONE KNEW ABOUT. NO PROBLEM. IN FACT, WE’RE IN DIRECT COMMUNICATION WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES.”

Hmm. What’s that smell?

Sudden Pentagon revelations about UFOs and recovered metal pieces of UFOs: an unknown ship in the sky executing maneuvers and operating at speeds beyond the reach of human technology; the failure to discover what a UFO is made of. These stories are coming right out of the Department of Defense. Officially. They’re not unauthorized leaks. And the moment the stories were handed to the NY Times, they became THE narrative.

The Pentagon owns the narrative, and so does the Times.

This is a necessary condition for big-time propaganda.

For decades, independent UFO researchers have been trying to force the government to admit what it knows—but now, when suddenly that magical moment arrives, the result is not what was hoped for, because the Pentagon and the Times can stake an overriding claim to the overall UFO story.

To consent to this new state of affairs requires blind faith in institutions which have a well-deserved reputation for lying.

It’s as if the Pentagon is saying, “We’ve been willing to go to war anywhere for any reason, based on false pretexts, but now we want you to believe exactly what we’re telling you about UFOs.”

More importantly, the Pentagon can now sell this: “For a long time, you’ve been listening to independent UFO researchers, but now we will take over the narrative, because we can provide truly authoritative information on the subject, and we can push rumor and speculation [independent research] to the side.”

Since 1987, investigating in the medical arena, I’ve been pointing out the horrendous consequences of allowing government agencies to own narratives. Horrendous, in terms of human damage incurred from medical drugs.

I’ll extend the parallel. During the height of the Health Freedom movement in America, in the 1990s, the federal National Institutes of Health (NIH), the largest medical research operation on the planet, suddenly announced they were forming a department to study unorthodox, formerly scorned “alternative treatments.” Papers would be written, research grants would be doled out, holistic practitioners would be brought into the fold. Voila. The “medical Pentagon” was opening its gates wide. Predictably, this effort turned out to be a con. There was no intention to allow a significant role for alternative medicine. The plan was to co-opt alternatives and let them die a slow death. But behind that con was another move: NIH was attempting to take over the “alternative” narrative.

NIH would now tell that story and own it and control it and decide who was in and who was out. Fortunately, the ploy has largely failed, because the public hasn’t viewed the government as a reliable source of knowledge about natural health.

When Big Media and the Pentagon are suddenly showing up like Greeks bearing UFO gifts, beware.

They may spread lies from wall to wall, or they may tell a bit of the whole truth and try to shut down the rest. Whatever they are doing, they’re selling a fake.

And lest we forget, the Pentagon is in the business of inventing threats. Everywhere. Will they now release new UFO “information” designed to promote “alien threats,” thus underscoring the need to expand the Department of Defense’s power? Or conversely, will they present a kind and gentle approach, in order to convince us the Pentagon is made up of good people lending a helping hand? Either way, they win…

If they can maintain control of the narrative.

That’s how propaganda works.

Who is OFFICIAL, and what is their OFFICIAL position? That’s the key.

In the blink of an eye, after a hundred thousand people have been digging into a mystery for decades, a force which people accept as OFFICIAL can hijack the mystery and explain it any way they want to. It’s aliens, UFOs, a Russian dictator, ISIS, criminals from an opposition political Party.

It doesn’t matter. It only matters that the OFFICIAL group has the (hypnotic) faith of the public in its pocket.

The group can even win over some of those independent investigators, who breathe a huge sigh of relief and say, “Finally, we’re getting the truth. OFFICIALLY.”

This acceptance is automatic.

“Oh, they obtained metals from UFOs and they couldn’t figure out what they were composed of. So the materials came from another planet. And a businessman has them in his warehouse. I don’t need to study them. The materials are OFFICIAL.”

That’s mind control par excellence.

Bow the head and bend the knee. We’re good. At last.

I’m not saying the story is fake or real. I’m saying when a stimulus gains an immediate response, the intended response, propaganda wins. The operatives pop the champagne corks. They done their job.

A year ago, the New York Times would have laughed at the very notion of someone trying to sell them this story. But now, the stars suddenly align, the reporters are sober and a bit breathless. They turned on a dime. The ship has sailed.

“Well now it’s different. Now we have a credible source.”

Really? A former employee from the Pentagon, the agency that’s “lost” trillions of dollars?

An employee named Luis Elizondo, who has this bio posted on his new company’s website, To the Stars Academy? Read his bio carefully:

—“Luis Elizondo is a career intelligence officer whose experience includes working with the U.S. Army, the Department of Defense, the National Counterintelligence Executive, and the Director of National Intelligence. As a former Special Agent In-Charge, Luis conducted and supervised highly sensitive espionage and terrorism investigations around the world. As an intelligence Case Officer, he ran clandestine source operations throughout Latin America and the Middle East.”

Wonderful. Of course. We can believe him. He’s official.

The question is: Official What?

High-level intelligence spook.


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

New gift-wrapped UFO revelations from the Pentagon: what’s going on?

New gift-wrapped UFO revelations from the Pentagon: what’s going on?

by Jon Rappoport

December 22, 2017

(UFO archive, here)

You’re walking through a sea of misinformation, disinformation, lies, speculation, goofball theories—and suddenly, the wise men behind the curtain decide to reach out and hand you unvarnished facts that blow your mind. What’s going on?

We have an entirely new gambit in the UFO disclosure game.

From loudwire.com (Dec.21): “[Musician Tom] DeLonge is currently working with former Pentagon official Luis Elizondo at To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science, which was founded by the ex-Blink guitarist.” This is a new UFO research and merchandising outfit.

DeLonge has taken it upon himself to expose the truth about UFOs. His new partner, Luis Elizondo, used to work for the Pentagon—and, boom, the mainstream press is suddenly telling us that Elizondo headed up a super-secret, $22 million a year Dept. of Defense UFO research group, from 2007 to 2012, the Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program (AATIP).

According to the NY Times and The Independent, the program had, and still has, metal pieces from a UFO(s), has been studying the pieces, and doesn’t knew what they’re made of.

The press has also just released a 2004 Dept. of Defense jackpot video purporting to show a US fighter jet off the coast of San Diego encountering a UFO, which hovers in place, wiggles, dances around, and suddenly zooms away at a shocking velocity.

The Independent: “Commander David Fravor and Lieutenant Commander Jim Slaight were on a routine training mission 100 miles out into the Pacific when they were asked to investigate the object.”

“Commander Fravor told The New York Times the object was about 40ft long, had no plumes, wings or rotors, and outpaced their F-18s. It was big enough to churn the sea 50ft below it, he said.”

My, my. All these revelations, all of a sudden. Bingo, bango, bongo.

Years of, “We don’t have any information, we don’t have any comment on the subject,” and then, out of the blue, “Yes we do and here it is.”

Let all the WHY NOW? speculations begin.

I would point out that, if this is a test to gauge public reaction to: THERE IS LIFE ELSEWHERE IN THE UNIVERSE AND A FEW OF THEM SHOWED UP HERE—the result of the test appears to be, so far: “Are we having the beef stew again tonight?”

This is interesting. People aren’t crowding into the streets and going wild. There are no parades. Presidents of countries aren’t holding major press conferences. I did read a piece about Trump drinking water again and possibly having trouble sipping it.

HELLO? WE AREN’T ALONE IN THE COSMOS.

“That’s nice. Is this Blue Bloods a repeat? I think I saw it a few months ago.”

Another tidbit on the secret Pentagon program: it was brought into being by Nevada Senator Harry Reid. He and a couple of his senate pals managed to divert a little chunk of black budget Pentagon money to set it up. (More yawns from the public.)

Understand: In the press stories of the past few days, there are no leaks. The Pentagon is the source. They’re admitting it. They’re pushing the story. They’re permitting a pilot, who no doubt has been bound by non-disclosure agreements, to go public and talk to mainstream media.

As with all planned releases of this magnitude, there are always “after-analyses.” It’s standard. How did the public respond? What % of the press and the public appear to have bought the story? Are there serious doubters? Who are they? What are they saying?

In this case, the report might read: “Very few people seem to care.”

This in itself is informative. People are on overload. They’re in a trance state below the level where a claimed revelation about Life in the Universe stirs them from their basic hypnotic state. Also, alternatively, many people are so cynical they don’t believe what the government is telling them.

Now, if Robert Mueller can connect a UFO to the Russians, and then to Trump, and the election, more people might respond.

The Pentagon claims it shut down the UFO research program in 2012, because other priorities were more important. Really? They captured a UFO on film doing things in space no craft on Earth can do, and they have pieces of metal from a UFO (how did they acquire them?) which they can’t analyze and are most likely not from this Earth—and yet they shut down the program because it was inconsequential? Nonsense.

One of the point men for spreading the current UFO stories is Ralph Blumenthal of the NY Times.

The Independent: “’They [the Pentagon] have some material from these [UFO] objects that is being studied, so that scientists can try to figure out what accounts for their amazing properties,’ Ralph Blumenthal, one of the authors of the New York Times report, told MSNBC. Mr. Blumenthal said the DoD ‘do not know’ what the materials are made of. It’s some sort of compound they do not recognise,’ he added.”

I have a bit of personal experience with Mr. Blumenthal. In 1993, he wrote a shocking story for the Times about the first bombing attack on the Twin Towers in New York. It focused on an FBI asset and informant, Emad Salem, who asserted that he had been instrumental in putting together the bombing plot. His handlers at the FBI were supposed to supply him with fake bombing materials, so there would be no explosion—however, at the last moment, they gave him actual live material. At the subsequent trial of the defendants, Salem was absent. He didn’t testify.

I got in touch with reporter Blumenthal some years later and asked him what happened to Salem and why he wasn’t allow to tell his story in the courtroom. Blumenthal got angry with me. He told me I didn’t understand his article. And that was that. In my opinion, he was backing away from his own reporting.

So now, with his UFO revelations, I have a few doubts.

It’s likely that, as Tom DeLonge and his Pentagon partner, Luis Elizondo, move forward, promoting their To the Stars Academy (whatever that turns out to be—a movie production company, a school, a store for UFO merchandise), they will be releasing new info on the US government UFO discoveries. So far, no one at the Pentagon is explaining why they’ve decided to make their revelations public now.

The military is not in the habit of doing the public great favors that involve secret programs.

If what the Pentagon is handing over to the mainstream press is legitimate and true Disclosure, it is most certainly a limited hangout on what they really know. And they will to continue to release more info, to see how the public responds, at every step.

But they will also seek to own the story and shape it any way they want to. Through their media fronts, they’ll sculpt the conclusions that “should be made.”

For example, suppose they go as far as this: 50 years ago, they found an alien body at a UFO crash site in the desert. Here are photos. The anatomy of the corpse is definitely not human. Since then, no other alien bodies have been seen, located, or discovered.

True? False? Who would know? Because they are the source of the story. Which is the way they want it to be.

If someone wants us to look at the truth, they disclose all the data and they open up all the files, and they allow us to see the material evidence up close and personal, so independent analyses can be performed. What are the odds that this will happen? When has this ever happened?

If anything, positioning themselves as the central source of the UFO story pushes citizen research into the background. Which is never a good thing.

I fully understand there will be many explanations, offered by many people, about why the Pentagon is releasing this information now. Here is one possibility: the secret program was really a tiny research effort; the Dept. of Defense has actually spent extraordinary amounts of money in this effort, over a long period of time—some of it from the trillions of dollars in the budget “they can’t account for.” Thus, they admit to a $22 million program, as a limited hangout.

Again, THEY WANT TO OWN THE UFO STORY. Going directly to mainstream news with it, where naïve reporters and reporters who are their assets will cover it exactly as the Pentagon intends—this is a major part of what is going on.

The psyop aspect of the Pentagon revelations is all about testing and gauging public response. Imagine that the Dept. of Defense eventually states they did find an alien body decades ago—and then the majority reaction is: “That’s fantastic. Did you see my car keys? I can’t find them.”

Not only would that inform psyop professionals about the UFO reaction, it would also let them know their decades of work, on many fronts, aimed at deadening, overloading, distracting, and shortening public awareness has been an overall success.

The most astounding information barely causes a ripple.

“This is wonderful. In many cases, we don’t have to figure out whether the public believes or doesn’t believe what we tell them. They’re in a state of mind that is ‘lower than belief.’ The majority can’t form beliefs or non-beliefs. They’re firmly embedded in a passive, repetitive, Pavlovian zone…”

In this regard, I refer you to my years of research on the effects of medical drugs, and for starters, my September 13 article, “How many drug prescriptions do doctors write per year?”:

Medical News Today reports that, in 2011, there was a modest uptick in the number of prescriptions written in the US.

The increase brought the total to: 4.02 billion.

Yes, in 2011, doctors wrote 4.02 billion prescriptions for drugs in America.

The Medical News Today article concluded, “…the industry should be heartened by the growth of the number of prescriptions and spending.” Yes, I’m sure the drug industry is popping champagne corks.

We’re talking about prescriptions here. We’re not talking about the number of pills Americans took. We’re also not counting over-the-counter drugs or vaccine shots.

A population drugged to the gills is passive…


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.