Measles outbreak in Europe: convenient lies

Measles outbreak in Europe: convenient lies

by Jon Rappoport

July 25, 2017

There is an invariable first rule of propaganda: know exactly what your agenda is, and then design every statement to forward that agenda.

The World Health Organization is now touting a measles epidemic in Europe. And of course, they’re explaining it with propaganda—it’s the fault of people who refuse to allow their children to take the measles vaccination.

The focus is on Italy, where, “coincidently,” protesters are outraged at a new law mandating vaccination for children. Perfect. “You see? Don’t take the shot and this is what you get. A massive outbreak.”

Well, here is an official report. In Italy, there are 3300 case of measles and two deaths.

That’s the classic and traditional and age-old picture of measles. 3298 children have survived. Kids get measles, they recover, and thereafter they’re immune.

As for the two children who died, you would have to do a very careful independent investigation, to determine what health problems they may have had before they contracted measles. And “health problems” would include prior toxic medical treatment. The actual cause of death isn’t always what health authorities say it is.

In addition to the above, here are two revealing quotes to consider:

“…the window of vulnerability of an infant may be even greater in vaccinated women than in with women with natural measles infection.” (Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 79(5), 2008, pp. 787–792).

Translation: Measles occurring in infants—which is unusual and dangerous—is more likely to occur when the mother has been vaccinated against measles. Why? Because, as a result of her being vaccinated, she no longer passes down, to her child, the natural components of immunity to measles from her having had the disease. And the vaccination she received didn’t confer immunity to her baby.

“Administration of KMV (killed measles vaccine) apparently set in motion an aberrant immunologic response that not only failed to protect children against natural measles, but resulted in heightened susceptibility.” JAMA Aug. 22, 1980, vol. 244, p. 804, Vincent Fulginiti and Ray Helfer. The authors indicate that such children can come down with “an often severe, atypical form of measles. Atypical measles is characterized by fever, headache… and a diverse rash (which)… may consist of a mixture of macules, papules, vesicles, and pustules… ”

In other words, the measles vaccine can create a worse form of measles. This is not the normal form of the illness, from which children routinely recover with the bonus of lifetime immunity. No, this is a severe, atypical, dangerous, synthetic, vaccine-induced disease.

Does all this mean the health authorities in Europe aren’t telling the whole story, are twisting the truth?

I’m shocked, I tell you. Shocked.

To cite just one parallel in the US among many, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) buys and dispenses several billion dollars’ worth of vaccines every year. At the same time, the CDC is in charge of doing key studies to test the safety and efficacy of those vaccines. This unconscionable conflict of interest is an ongoing crime—because there are NO circumstances under which the CDC would ever say that vaccines are dangerous and ineffective, since they, the CDC, are a leading commercial customer and purveyor of those medical products. They would be cutting their own throats.

Do public health authorities lie?

Is the Pope Catholic?


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

New Ebola outbreak, or is it a hoax?

New Ebola outbreak, or is it a hoax?

by Jon Rappoport

May 22, 2017

News outlets are reporting a new Ebola outbreak in Africa. Here is a quick summary of the basic mainstream story—

The Huffington Post cites a World Health Organization (WHO) statement: four people are believed to have died from Ebola in the Congo.

There are 37 more “suspected cases.”

Discussions are underway about using an “experimental vaccine” in the Congo.

WHO has declared the Ebola outbreak an epidemic.

There is an effort to find 400 people believed to have come into contact with the “suspected cases.” Residents in the affected area of the Congo, the remote Bas-Uele province, are fleeing in fear.

That’s it so far.

I’ve been around the block on the Ebola story a dozen times. Here are the issues the press isn’t reporting—

There is one predictable outcome: at Congo clinics and hospitals, frightened people who arrive with what are labeled “early signs” of Ebola will be labeled as probable cases. What are those symptoms? Fever, chill, sore throat, cough, headache, joint pain. Sound familiar? Normally, this would just be called the flu.

Here’s another point you won’t see discussed on the mainstream news: the reliability of tests used to diagnose Ebola.

Two of those major tests—antibody and PCR—are notoriously unreliable.

Antibody tests will register positive for disease because they ping on factors that have nothing to do with the disease being looked for. And even when the test is accurate, a positive reading merely shows that the patient came in contact with the germ in question. It says nothing about whether he’s ill or is going to become ill.

In fact, before 1985, when the science was turned on its head, antibody-positive status was taken to mean the patient’s immune system had successfully warded off the germ.

The PCR test is a sophisticated way of amplifying tiny, tiny bits of what are assumed to be viral material, so they can be observed. The problem here is this: if only tiny bits of material could be found in the patient’s body in the first place, there is no reason to suppose they’re enough to cause disease. Very, very large amounts of virus are necessary to begin to suspect the patient is ill or is going to become ill.

Bottom line: huge numbers of people on whom these tests are done are going to be falsely diagnosed with Ebola.

Here is what I wrote about the Ebola outbreak of 2014 in Africa. It applies today:

Ebola, covert op in a hypnotized world, August 2, 2014:

You show people a germ and you tell them what it is and what it does, and people salute. They give in. They believe. They actually know nothing. But they believe.

The massive campaign to make people believe the Ebola virus can attack at any moment, after the slightest contact, is quite a success.

People are falling all over themselves to raise the level of hysteria.

This is what is preventing a hard look at Liberia, Sierra Leone, and the Republic Guinea, three African nations where poverty and illness are staples of everyday life for the overwhelming number of people.

The command structure in those areas has a single dictum: don’t solve the human problem.

Don’t clean up the contaminated water supplies, don’t return stolen land to the people so they can grow food and finally achieve nutritional health, don’t solve overcrowding, don’t install basic sanitation, don’t strengthen their immune systems so they can ward off germs, don’t let the people have power—because then they would throw off the local and global corporate juggernauts that are sucking the land of all its resources.

In order not to solve the problems of the people, a cover story is necessary. A cover story that exonerates the power structure.

A cover story like a germ.

It’s all about the germ. The demon. The strange attacker.

Forget everything else. The germ is the single enemy.

Forget the fact, for example, that a recent study of 15 pharmacies and 5 hospital drug dispensaries in Sierra Leone discovered the widespread and unconscionable use of beta-lactam antibiotics.

These drugs are highly toxic. One of their effects? Excessive bleeding.

Which just happens to be the scary “Ebola effect” that’s being trumpeted in the world press.

(J Clin Microbiol, July 2013, 51(7), 2435-2438), and Annals of Internal Medicine Dec. 1986, “Potential for bleeding with the new beta-lactam antibiotics”)

Forget the fact that pesticide companies are notorious for shipping banned toxic pesticides to Africa. One effect of the chemicals? Bleeding.

Forget that. It’s all about the germ and nothing but the germ.

Forget the fact that, for decades, one of the leading causes of death in the Third World has been uncontrolled diarrhea. Electrolytes are drained from the body, and the adult or the baby dies. (Diarrhea is also listed as an “Ebola” symptom.)

Any sane doctor would make it his first order of business to replace electrolytes with simple supplementation—but no, the standard medical line goes this way:

The diarrhea is caused by germs in the intestinal tract, so we must pile on massive amounts of antibiotics to kill the germs.

The drugs kill off all bacteria in the gut, including the necessary and beneficial ones, and the patient can’t absorb what little food he has access to, and he dies.

Along the way, he can also bleed.

But no, all the bleeding comes from Ebola. It’s the germ. Don’t think about anything else.

Forget the fact that adenovirus vaccines, which have been used in Liberia, Guinea, and Liberia (the epicenter of Ebola), have, according to vaccines.gov, the following adverse effects: blood in the urine or stool, and diarrhea.

No, all the bleeding comes from the Ebola germ. Of course. Don’t think about anything else.

Reporter Charles Yates uncovered a scandal in Liberia centering around the Firestone Rubber Plantation—chemical dumping, poisoned water.

And skin disease.

“Rash” is listed as one of the Ebola symptoms.

Liberia Coca Cola bottling plant: foul black liquid seeping into the environment—animals dying.

Chronic malnutrition and starvation—conditions that are endemic in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea—are the number-one cause of T-cells depletion in the world.

T-cells are a vital component of the immune system. When that system is compromised, any germ coming down the pipeline will cause epidemics and death.

Getting the picture?

But no, blame it all on the germ.

Allow the corporate-government domination to continue.

—end of my 2014 article—

There is more, but I’ll leave it there for the moment.

The mainstream story about Ebola is riddled with hoax.

It’s “blame the virus” for illness and dying that come from other obvious sources.


The Matrix Revealed

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, The Matrix Revealed, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Grand deception in virus and disease research

Grand deception in virus and disease research

by Jon Rappoport

March 31, 2017

Public health officials usually fail to announce their reasons for claiming a particular virus causes a particular disease; they make those claims in an arbitrary authoritarian fashion.

In this article, I’m going to describe two vital steps in the process of proving a virus causes a disease. There are more steps, but these two will highlight a gaping problem.

I’m putting the information in a Q&A format:

Q: Let’s say researchers are claiming there is a new outbreak of a disease, or there is a disease they’ve never seen before. What’s their first step?

A: Most of the time, they assume a virus is the cause, rather than, say, a pesticide or a medical drug. They jump in and start looking for a virus.

Q: And when they find a virus?

A: Assuming they really do find one, they then look for correlation.

Q: What does that mean?

A: Let’s say they claim they’ve discovered 600 cases of the disease. They try to find the same virus in all those people. Because, if you say a virus causes a particular disease, you have to show that virus is present in all known cases of the disease—or an overwhelming percentage of cases, at the very least.

Q: That would be proof…

A: That would be one step of proof.

Q: Suppose, in these 600 cases, they can find the same virus in a hundred cases. Isn’t that pretty significant?

A: No. It isn’t. It means you couldn’t find the virus in 500 cases. And if that’s true, there is no reason to assume you have the right virus. In fact, it’s very strong evidence you don’t have the virus that’s causing the disease. It’s a compelling reason to go back to the drawing board. You say, “Well, we were wrong about that virus, let’s look for a different one.”

Q: All right. What if you do find the virus in 583 cases out of 600? Then what do you do?

A: You have to understand that the mere PRESENCE of the virus in all those cases ISN’T PROOF it’s causing disease. Lots of people walk around with the same virus in their bodies, but that virus isn’t causing them to get sick. You have to go further.

Q: Meaning?

A: Well, the next step would be finding that the 583 cases have a whole lot of the same virus in their bodies. A great quantity of virus. Not merely a trace. Not merely a little bit.

Q: Why?

A: Because cells in the body are reproducing all the time. If the amount of virus in the body is only infecting a tiny fraction of a particular type of cell, the virus isn’t going to cause a problem. The body is going to produce gigantic numbers of fresh uninfected cells every day.

Q: Do researcher carry out this kind of investigation? Do they assess how much virus is in a person’s body?

A: There are many situations where they don’t. For example, with the Zika virus, I see no evidence researchers examined many, many cases to see how much Zika was present.

Q: Why didn’t they?

A: You’d have to ask them. Perhaps they started to do that, and found there was only a tiny bit of Zika in the babies they examined, and they didn’t want to publicize the fact. They just wanted to assume Zika was the causes of babies being born with small heads and brain damage. But assuming isn’t proving.

Q: You’re talking about a major gap in research.

A: Yes.

Q: What method is used to decide how much virus is in a person’s body?

A: There are several methods. For example, the PCR test.

Q: What’s that?

A: With the PCR, you take a tiny, tiny sample of tissue from a patient. It’s so small you can’t observe it directly. You assume, you hope, you think this sample is a fragment of a virus. Now you amplify that fragment many times, until you can observe it, until you can (hopefully) identify it as the virus you claim is causing the disease…

Q: But that test wouldn’t tell you HOW MUCH virus is in the person’s body.

A: Many researchers believe the PCR allows you to infer how much virus is in a person’s body. I see no convincing evidence they can make such an inference. But also—you have to ask yourself, why did they do the PCR test in the first place? And the answer is: they couldn’t find, by more direct methods, any virus! If they had been able to, they wouldn’t have done the PCR. In other words, there was no reason to believe the patient had enough virus in his body to make him sick.

Q: Again, it seems there is a gaping hole in the research.

A: Indeed. But that doesn’t stop scientists from claiming they’ve found the virus that is causing a disease. I would cite two examples. In 2009, the CDC was embarrassed to learn that the overwhelming percentage of tests on Swine Flu patients were coming back from labs with NO TRACE of Swine Flu virus or any other flu virus. And in 2003, in Canada, more and more SARS patients were showing NO TRACE of the SARS virus.

Q: They would be enormous scandals.

A: They should have been enormous scandals, but the news was suppressed and buried.

Q: These people who were labeled with SARS and Swine Flu—what was really making these people sick?

A: There could have been a variety of causes. Don’t assume all so-called SARS or Swine Flu patients were sick for the same reason. The symptoms of these two illnesses were vague enough and general enough to have stemmed from a variety of causes. Since that’s the case, there was no reason to use the SARS and Swine Flu labels in the first place.

Q: The labels were a deception.

A: Yes. The labels group people together when there is no compelling reason to do so. But when you DO group people together with a disease label, you can sell drugs and vaccines designed to “treat the label.”


power outside the matrix

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)


Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Zika: Who launched the fake-epidemic story in Brazil?

Zika: Who launched the fake-epidemic story in Brazil?

Explosive: The invention of an epidemic

by Jon Rappoport

February 7, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

This is an article that explains a great deal—but, with apologies, it involves a line of reasoning, in order to reach a conclusion. That means some readers (not my regular readers) may find it odd. Some readers with short attention spans may suddenly want to switch to a wrestling show or a shopping network. To them I say: give this a try; it does have a payoff; it has its own kind of shock and surprise; explosions do go off in the mind; it is like a ten-car pile-up on the interstate in the fog, late at night; and there is a very nasty plot.

Out of nowhere, a month ago, we were told there was an outbreak of microcephaly in Brazil: over 4,000 cases of babies born with small heads and brain impairment.

The Brazilian researchers then went in and took a closer look at that figure. They walked it back and said there were, at best, only 404 confirmed cases of microcephaly.

Going from 4,000 cases to 404 cases was a revelation. It means there is no reason to claim, so far, that there is an epidemic of microcephaly.

Then, another stunner. Of the 404 cases, only 17 “had a relationship with the Zika virus.” Therefore, obviously, there was no Zika-causing-microcephaly story, either.

Even in those 17 cases, the mere presence of the Zika virus was no evidence the virus was causing microcephaly in 17 babies. A virus has to be more than “present.” It has to be there in huge numbers in an individual human. And the Brazilian researchers haven’t provided any evidence that Zika was present in huge numbers in any of the 17 babies.

There is more. The whole effort of the researchers was to show, if possible, that Zika was present in all the 404 microcephaly cases. You see, they were doing preliminary work. They were looking for the cause of microcephaly. And when you’re on that kind of hunt, you’re trying to find some factor that is present in most or all cases. Otherwise, it’s not the cause.

The Zika hunting expedition failed miserably. The researchers actually showed that Zika wasn’t the cause.

Let me put it to you this way. 400 tourists staying a hotel fall ill with the same symptoms. Researchers try to find the cause. They propose, as a preliminary idea, that the tourists all ate apple sauce. So they interview the sick tourists, they examine the contents of their stomachs, they talk to kitchen workers—and they discover only 17 of the 400 tourists ate apple sauce. Conclusion? Apple sauce is not the cause of the illness. There is no reason to claim it’s the cause in the 17 people who ate it, either. Apple sauce, as an explanation, is a complete dud.

All right. So we have no evidence that there is a widespread epidemic of microcephaly. And for those cases that do exist, we have no evidence, so far, that Zika virus is the cause.

Given all this, a few new questions naturally arise. How did the notion that Zika virus might be the cause suddenly appear in the first place? And who started the story that there was an epidemic of microcephaly?

Let me take up that second question. Apparently, several doctors at two or three hospitals in Brazil noticed more babies with microcephaly than usual. Their report went to someone at the Brazilian health authority. And then a call went out all over the country asking for reports of cases of microcephaly. Those reports came in. They weren’t necessarily accurate. When the numbers were added up, they came to more than 4000.

Then, researchers began to sift through 3,670 of those reports to see what was actually happening—and so far, they see only 404 cases of microcephaly.

Now let’s look at the first question: who proposed the apple sauce? Who proposed the idea that Zika, a virus known about since 1947, a virus which had never been known to cause more than mild transient illness, a virus surely present in humans all over the planet, was now suddenly wreaking great devastation in babies—deformity, brain damage? Who made that very strange leap?

Here is a clue.

This is a quote from a World Health Organization press release, dated January 28, 2016: “WHO to convene an International Health Regulations Emergency Committee on Zika virus and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations”:

“In May 2015, Brazil reported its first case of Zika virus disease. Since then, the disease has spread within Brazil and to 24 other countries in the region.”

This is clearly a deception. The first Zika case in Brazil, for a virus that’s been known about since 1947? In India, Zika has been known about (“Zika Fever”) for a long, long time. Discovering “the first” Zika case in Brazil has some special meaning? As I stated above, it’s well known that the virus causes only mild illness and goes away in a short time. So why would anyone care about a Zika case in Brazil? As for the WHO assertion that Zika has subsequently spread (like an epidemic) throughout Brazil and 24 other countries, this is absurd. It would be like saying, “We discovered a person driving a Volkswagen in Brazil. Since then, the occurrence of people driving Volkswagens had spread across Brazil and 24 other countries.” No, the drivers and the Volkswagens were already there.

Why would researchers at WHO make this fundamental error? Why would they make this preposterous claim?

Part of the reason leads back to a preoccupation with (actually, an obsession with) hunting for viruses. Hunting for them, finding them, and then, based on no solid evidence, claiming they cause various disease-conditions.

I’ll continue with a further quote from the January 28 WHO media release:

“Arrival of the virus in some countries of the Americas, notably Brazil, has been associated with a steep increase in the birth of babies with abnormally small heads… A causal relationship between Zika virus infection and birth defects and neurological syndromes has not been established, but is strongly suspected.”

Notice the use of the phrase, “associated with.” This is not true, as we’ve seen, because the Brazilian researchers have found the Zika virus (or indirect evidence of it) in only 17 of the 404 confirmed cases of microcephaly. There is no association. There is disassociation. Remember, in order to begin to say a particular virus is causing a disease, you must find it in almost all, or all, cases of that condition. What WHO is pointing to, re Zika, doesn’t even begin to approach this standard. And as you can see from the above quote, WHO admits they have established no causal connection between Zika and microcephaly.

Yet WHO has been spearheading the drive to blame Zika and, yes, invent the idea that there is a “spreading epidemic” of Zika. Much of what you’re reading and seeing in the mainstream press about this “epidemic” comes directly out of WHO press releases and director Margaret Chan’s remarks.

WHO is determined to fabricate a viral epidemic and its causal connection to microcephaly.

Here is the final quote I want to highlight from the January 28 WHO media release:

“WHO’s Regional Office for the Americas (PAHO) has been working closely with affected countries since May 2015. PAHO has mobilized staff and members of the Global Outbreak and Response Network (GOARN) to assist ministries of health in strengthening their abilities to detect the arrival and circulation of Zika virus through laboratory testing and rapid reporting. The aim has been to ensure accurate clinical diagnosis and treatment for patients, to track the spread of the virus and the mosquito that carries it, and to promote prevention, especially through mosquito control.”

Notice the date mentioned in the quote—May 2015. That’s when “the first case of Zika” was discovered in Brazil. WHO sent people to the scene immediately. They sent their virus hunters from GOARN, which is the WHO equivalent of the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS). The virus hunters. Show them a situation; they will find a virus and make an warranted claim about it and push the story forward.

That’s what they’ve done, against all the counter-evidence. They’ve invented a epidemic that doesn’t exist, blaming it on a virus that has never caused serious illness, and they’ve connected that virus, with no evidence, to microcephaly.

It would be like saying, “There was a 20-car crash on the interstate last night, and three miles away, on a lonely road, a boy was walking with his dog. The boy is the prime suspect. He is ‘associated’ with the car crash. And then, on top of that absurdity, we discover that, on the interstate, we can only find two cars that have collided, not 20.”

But the biggest public-health agency in the world is sticking to its story about the 20-car crash and its “association” with the boy walking his dog.

This does not indicate a mere error. This indicates a fixation. “We must find a virus and claim it is the cause.” It also indicates an intention to fabricate.

All right. We’ve now reached the end of the first part of my argument. Let’s proceed and go to motive.

For that exposition, I rely on the very well-known consequences of WHO making its entirely unwarranted and bogus case: an epidemic can be announced. They (WHO) can claim there is an epidemic caused by a spreading virus.

Follow me here. This is crucial. Merely saying there are some microcephaly cases in Brazil, and they can come from many different causes—since any insult to the developing fetal brain can bring about microcephaly—a toxic drug, a toxic pesticide, the pregnant woman falls down a flight of stairs—merely saying there are some microcephaly cases in Brazil creates no appearance of a contagious epidemic spreading around the world.

For WHO, that’s a non-starter. It goes nowhere. But linking microcephaly to a virus and then “discovering” the virus has “broken out” of its “previous containment in Brazil” and is “traveling around the world” and is “causing microcephaly”—-now WHO is in business.

Constructing these several garish lies and hooking them together achieves multiple objectives. The people at WHO may be crazy, but they aren’t stupid. They understand how much hay they can make through their invention.

With the fairy tale about a galloping virus and its potential to create, in any pregnant woman, brain damage to her developing baby, they have a scary epidemic to run and manage and control. They have work, in the same way a movie director has work with a good script that can sell vs. one that won’t. Their allies can rush to develop a (completely unnecessary) vaccine. When the vaccine is ready (ready to make large profits), WHO can run that operation, too, by issuing all sorts of alerts about the need to get vaccinated. WHO can also issue “health directives” about “prevention” to every national government on Earth, thus cementing its superior role as a leading planetary command-post.


power outside the matrix


In past articles, I’ve examined destructive agendas coalescing around multiple factors: toxic vaccines; the promotion and induction of illness; “the virus” as a cover story invoked to protect, for example, mega-corporations that poison populations with pesticides; the in-utero-to-cradle-to-grave system of toxic medical care, and so on. In this article, I just want to show how the invention of an epidemic occurs, how it’s done. How it’s put together.

This is one aspect of the medical Matrix right in front of your eyes: the twisting and curling and distorting and forcing of disparate data into one coordinated scenario that, on analysis, completely falls apart.

Let me give it to you in one boiled-down imaginary quote:

“Okay, boys, this is what we have. Some cases of microcephaly in Brazil. Not many confirmed cases. So, first thing, we have to blow that number up. Get rolling on that. Next, we have this harmless dud of a virus, Zika, which we can find in all sorts of people anywhere in the world. It means nothing, of course, but we’re going to make it mean something. We’re going to claim it causes microcephaly. Wow. Even I’m blown away by the sheer audacity of that. Once we make this spurious connection, we can say women all over the planet are at risk. We can say the virus is spreading and we can confirm that through testing— because, as we know, it’s already there. It’s been there forever. Anywhere. Everywhere. And we say, you see, this virus that causes a horrible birth defect is spreading and popping up in a dozen, 20, 40, 70 countries. Now we’re in business. We potentially have the fight-or-flight mechanism of the whole planet under our control. That’s our goal. Let’s get to work and see how far we can take this Good Battles Evil fairy tale. Remember, we’re the Good. People need to be controlled. Otherwise, who knows what they might do? We do the controlling.”

Indeed.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Zika: sex and bloodsucking vampire bugs: the movie

Zika: sex and bloodsucking vampire bugs: the movie

by Jon Rappoport

February 3, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

Evidence? Who cares about evidence? You give people the mere announcement of an outbreak plus a virus and they’ll cling to it as if it’s a long-lost relative who’s about to die and leave them a billion dollars.

In two previous articles, I laid to rest the notion that anyone has proved there is an epidemic of microcephaly or that the Zika virus causes microcephaly. Those articles are: Zika freaka: the other shoe drops: lying about case numbers and Zika: biggest news service in America absolutely clueless.

Bottom line: Brazilian researchers have only been able to confirm, so far, 270 cases of microcephaly, not 4000 as originally trumpeted. And of those 270 cases, only six, that’s six, were found to have any trace of the Zika virus. If that’s an epidemic, a floor lamp can jump up and sing I’ve Got You Under My Skin in Mandarin Chinese.

But now the Centers for Disease Control has upped the ante—a few cases of “Zika-virus transmission” through, wait for it, sex, have been discovered. The tiny Zika terrorist is riding in semen. OMG. OMG.

Put this together with biting bloodsucking mosquitoes carrying Zika and you have a blockbuster boffo box office movie. Put it up on IMAX. Who will they pick to do the Voice of God narration?

Let’s see. Transmission of a virus through sex. The virus hasn’t been shown to cause anything. Conclusion? No fear. But that doesn’t sell. That doesn’t titillate. So forget about evidence or proof. Just market the damn movie.

Here are the old standby memes: “Spread. Transmission of the virus. Infected. Carrier. New cases with the virus.”

What we’re left with, at this point, are these garbage terms the public swallows without inspection. That goes for news reporters as well, and many, many scientists. These key phrases are intended to create caution and fear, as authorities map Zika journeys from city to city and country to country.

So I’ll quickly break down the memes and reveal them for the slugs they are.

“Spread.” For a virus that has existed for who knows how long (it was first discovered in 1947), the notion of spread is moronic. Of course it spreads. It walks down the street, it takes the subway, it hails a cab, it jumps on a plane, it crawls through the woods, it rides via semen, it stands up on stage and runs a quiz show. It’s already been around the world a few thousand times and it’s already in people’s bodies from Tierra del Fuego to Nome. So? What do we have? A virus which hasn’t been shown to cause microcephaly or any serious illness is everywhere. Big deal. There are millions of different viruses. Most of them do nothing. They hang out, once they’re in a place they like, and they watch The Young and the Restless. They spread, but basically they’re already there.

“Transmission of the virus.” Ditto. I just explained that. The answer is yes and so what.

“Carrier.” Ditto again. You might have Zika. And you, too. So what?

“New cases with the virus.” Ditto one more time. Except the people with Zika in their bodies aren’t cases. They may carry cases, as in suitcases. They may try cases, as in lawyers. But they aren’t cases.

“Infected.” This word suggests a person has a virus and the virus is causing a problem. Inflammation, swelling, fever. Even accepting the traditional literature on Zika, all we see are minor symptoms and brief discomfort. It wasn’t until very recently that anyone suggested Zika is causing microcephaly. And, as I’ve shown, this notion was premature, without supporting evidence. There was no reason for the press explosion, for suggestions of an epidemic, for government and health agency pronouncements about a worldwide emergency.

As an investigator, you have to go back to the beginning. Whenever an announcement of an “outbreak” is made, and a cause is trumpeted, you have to find out how many cases of the disease actually exist. Is it really an outbreak? And then you have to look for evidence that the presumed cause is really causing anything. If you don’t look deeply into those questions, you’ll climb on board the train that has been prepared for you and take the ride. You may then come up with ideas about how the cause was “secretly introduced,” but if the purported cause isn’t the cause, and if there isn’t an epidemic, what do you have?

In the case of Brazil, genetically engineered mosquitoes and the Tdap vaccine, for example, are important factors to explore, because they can certainly have destructive effects on health. Yes. But to use those factors to explain “what’s really going on with the epidemic and the Zika virus”—you’re still riding on the basic propaganda train where there is no actual evidence of an epidemic or a harmful virus.

Unfortunately, most people are disappointed when an exotic piece of charlatan dazzle turns out to be a dud. They would rather believe, instead of experiencing the feeling of being left with nothing.

They would rather go to the movies and watch flying little demons sucking blood from unsuspecting humans and injecting those humans with invisible microscopic sub-demons and, in the wake of that, sex turns out to be a catastrophe of global proportions. That’s a two-hour jolt of adrenaline.

That’s worth the price of the ticket.

That’s show-biz.


power outside the matrix


Let me put it to you this way. If you had a few billion bucks and straight-line control of fawning media, you could concoct the most ridiculous and absurd story of fear anyone ever heard of, and the networks would blast it out as absolute fact. And people all over the world would believe it and tremble. And then, when that story was absolutely exposed as pure invention, there would still be many people who would say: “But maybe the story is true. Maybe it is. Maybe there really are green-eyed people born with a special genetic defect that makes them travel to Tahiti and shovel snow 365 days a year on the beaches, and maybe they can pass this defect along to the locals and then the defect is transmitted around the world and people will shovel imaginary snow 24/7, day after day, until they weaken and fall down and go into a coma. Yes, it could be. It would be unwise of me to reject the possibility, because if it’s true…”

That’s how fear is sold and stays sold, no matter what.

The “if it’s true” tag line.

That’s what the sleazy hustlers put on the movie posters, my friends, under the pictures of the flying demons:

“What if it’s true?”

That’s the eternal hook.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Zika: biggest news service in America absolutely clueless

Zika: biggest news service in America absolutely clueless

by Jon Rappoport

February 2, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

First, many thanks to great investigative reporter and researcher, Jim West, for help on this story.

Okay, here we go.

Of course, I’m talking about the Associated Press (AP)—and its recent coverage of the Zika story: January 27, “270 of 4,180 suspected microcephaly cases confirmed.”

AP actually had its hands on the most explosive information possible, it reported that information in one stunning paragraph, and then it let that paragraph sit there like a dead corpse. It didn’t do anything with it. Just another day at the office. Connect the dots? See the implications? Never heard of it.

To set this up, earlier in the story, AP revealed that Brazilian researchers have been re-checking their own work on Zika, and lo and behold, the original 4,180 cases of babies born with small heads and brain impairment (microcephaly) have turned out to be only 270.

The Brazilians are going through more records. But so far, the “epidemic” is not even close to an epidemic. The whole story that has spread all over the world was based on 4,180 cases. Without that number, there would have been no story.

The AP piece then goes on to revelation number two. This is even more stunning:

“Brazilian officials said the babies with the defect [microcephaly/small heads, brain damage] and their mothers are being tested to see if they had been infected. Six of the 270 confirmed microcephaly cases were found to have the [Zika] virus.” (emphasis added)

Hello, AP? Anyone home? Pick up. Don’t you see what you’re reporting? Don’t you get it?

So far, there are only six confirmed cases where a baby was born with microcephaly and also had the Zika virus. Six cases. That’s six.

And on that basis, health agencies and governments and media outlets all over the world are going crazy with warnings about the Zika virus.

There is absolutely no evidence that Zika is causing anything here. Zero evidence.

To even begin to think a virus is causing a condition, you must be able to show that the virus is present in the overwhelming majority of cases.

That test has not been passed re Zika. It has utterly failed thus far.

With this information, the Associated Press did nothing. They didn’t press the experts. They didn’t go anywhere. They didn’t ask questions. They reported the bombshell…and then they walked away.

There’s more. In their story, AP reaches out to a representative of the CDC. The subject is the number of microcephaly cases in the US every year. They’re doing a comparison between the US and Brazil. AP states:

“The United States, with about 4 million births a year, has an estimated 2,500 cases of microcephaly a year, said Margaret Honein, a CDC epidemiologist.”

The reader of the article shrugs and moves on. There’s only one problem. The CDC epidemiologist is dead wrong. Or the AP misprinted the number. Incompetently. Or on purpose. Who can say? I can’t, because although I phoned the AP yesterday and left a message about the egregious error, they haven’t gotten back to me. The AP error, you see, is this:

It isn’t 2,500 cases a year. It’s 25,000. As in thousand.

Every year in the US—and the conventional medical literature is very clear on this—there are 25,000 babies born with microcephaly.

(See “Practice Parameter: Evaluation of the child with microcephaly (an evidence-based review)”; Neurology 2009 Sep 15; 73(11) 887-897; Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.)

Why is this significant? Because, obviously, the Zika virus isn’t the cause. In fact, the same literature states that any insult to the fetal brain during pregnancy can cause microcephaly. The mother falls down the stairs. She is severely malnourished. She ingests a poison, a street drug, a toxic medical drug.

But if the AP, in its story, had published the actual number of microcephaly cases in the US every year (25,000 not 2,500), and compared it to the known number of microcephaly cases in Brazil at this point (270), people might wake up and say, “Why is Brazil the focus? Why is the situation in Brazil causing a worldwide crisis? Are the World Health Organization and the CDC crazy?

The answer to that last question, of course, is yes. But not just crazy. First and foremost, they’re liars.

Referring back to my original point about the Brazilian researchers finding only 270 confirmed cases of microcephaly, and then only six of those with the Zika virus, the World Health Organization has taken that information and spun it—and media outlets have followed suit. The 270 Brazilian cases of microcephaly are now coupled with the phrase: “…with evidence of an infection.”

Let me translate that clever piece of manipulation. The implication is: all 270 cases also have the Zika virus. That’s what “infected” means.

Not just six cases with the virus. No. All 270 cases.

A lie.


power outside the matrix


So, all you women who are thinking about having a baby: don’t. Don’t get pregnant. Don’t travel to 22 countries. Believe the authorities. They know what’s best for you. They always do. Surely, there’s a global epidemic underway. Out of nine billion people, 270 in Brazil have microcephaly, and six of those have the virus that could impair your baby. This makes perfect sense. Of course it does. If you have the thinking power of a rock. If you’re committed to a life of abject fear, based on nothing.

Perhaps it’s dawning on some of you that we’re in the wrong business. We should be starting our own branch of Fear, Inc. Our product would sell like crazy.

Or we could just put the World Health Organization on our personal terror watch list.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.

Zika freaka: the other shoe drops: lying about case numbers

Zika freaka: the other shoe drops: lying about case numbers

by Jon Rappoport

January 31, 2016

(To read about Jon’s mega-collection, Power Outside The Matrix, click here.)

Suppose the actual number of cases of microcephaly (babies born with small heads and brain impairment) are much fewer than reported?

Then all efforts to explain some “extraordinary, unusual, dire, and sudden situation” are misguided, are based on a lie.

Then we would have to backtrack and conceive of what is happening in Brazil in a whole different way.

I was waiting for this one. I’ve been investigating so-called epidemics since 1987. And over and over, I’ve seen health authorities lie about case numbers. Sometimes, they just make up incredible numbers out of thin air—as with Swine Flu, for example. In the fall of 2009, the US Centers for Disease Control estimated there were, get this, 22 million cases in the US.

And that was after Sharyl Attkisson, then a star investigative reporter for CBS News, found out the CDC had actually stopped counting Swine Flu cases. Why did they stop? Because the overwhelming number of blood samples from likely Swine Flu patients sent to labs came back negative for Swine Flu or any flu. So the CDC doubled down and decided to tell a real whopper. That’s an old propaganda trick. Tell a gigantic lie and people will salute it.

How about Zika? Microcephaly (babies with abnormally small heads and brain damage) is supposed to be the result of the Zika virus, which for 60 years has caused, at worst, mild illness.

Now we have a January 27 Associated Press story out of Rio, published in SFGate: “270 of 4,180 suspected microcephaly cases confirmed.”

That’s called a clue, in case you’re wondering. Of the previously touted 4,180 cases of microcephaly in Brazil, the actual number of confirmed cases is, well, only 270.

Bang.

Of course, this won’t stop the press from building up fear about the dreaded virus, and Brazilian soldiers will still be going door to door handing out toxic mosquito sprays, and drug companies will continue to race forward to develop a vaccine for Zika—because The Machine is in gear and moving. Damn the torpedoes and the facts.

Here are quotes from the January 27 AP story, with my comments:

“RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — New figures released Wednesday by Brazil’s Health Ministry as part of a probe into the Zika virus have found fewer cases of a rare birth defect than first feared.

“Researchers have been looking at 4,180 suspected cases of microcephaly reported since October. On Wednesday, officials said they had done a more intense analysis of more than 700 of those cases, confirming 270 cases and ruling out 462 others.”

My comment: Stop the music. What about the other 3448 suspected cases? No word. What does this mean? It means so far, there are only 270 confirmed cases of microcephaly. It definitely means that. Will the researchers in Brazil check into the other suspected 3448 cases, or are they so embarrassed they’d rather quit the whole investigation and pretend it never happened? Because, you see, the whole story started rolling because of the reported 4,180 cases. Without those high (false) numbers at the outset, there never would have been a story or a high degree of alarm and hysteria.

AP: “But what that means is hard to say, according to some experts. It does not answer whether the tropical Zika virus is causing the babies to have unusually small heads. Nor does it really tell us how big the problem is.”

My comment: Exactly. Zika as the cause of microcephaly is completely unconfirmed. That’s un-confirmed. They jumped the gun. And they don’t know how many cases of microcephaly there are.

AP: “But the World Health Organization and others have stressed that any link between Zika and the defect [microcephaly] remains circumstantial and is not yet proven scientifically. And the new figures were a reminder of just how little is known about the disease and its effects.”

My comment: Wonderful. Not yet proven scientifically. How little is known. But on that basis let’s call Zika an epidemic spreading across the world endangering all pregnant women or women who will get pregnant. This I call Depopulation by Press Conference: “Better to postpone pregnancy.” Governments and health agencies issue dire releases and then remain willfully blind. Business as usual.

AP: “Brazilian officials said the babies with the defect [microcephaly] and their mothers are being tested to see if they had been infected. Six of the 270 confirmed microcephaly cases were found to have the [Zika] virus.”
(Emphasis added)

My comment: Let me get this straight. Let me read that paragraph again. Brazilian officials have confirmed only 270 cases of microcephaly. That’s all. Got that. And of those 270, only six, just six were found to have the Zika virus?? Are you kidding me? Six? And governments all over the world are claiming that Zika causes microcephaly, causes abnormally small heads and brain damage? What?

In case this is not clear, let me spell it out. You can’t say a virus causes a condition if the virus isn’t there.

“Well, Mr. Smith, you have the flu. The flu is caused by a virus. That’s the one and only cause. You don’t have the virus, but you have the flu. Okay? Take two logic courses and call me in the morning if you figure out I’m lying through my teeth.”

I’ve learned this lesson over and over again. Before saying that a virus is causing a condition, find out how many actual cases of the condition are nailed down. Then, for those cases, find out if the virus in question is present at all. Because, if it isn’t present, there is nothing to talk about. As in: nothing.

There are people out there who are already taking off from Zika Zika Zika, and they’re saying the virus was made in a lab, or it was brought to Earth by aliens. I suggest they go back to the beginning and realize the whole bloody story so far is shot full of holes.

It is made out of holes.

My prediction: If necessary, if people start to wake up about the hoax, if scientists begin to grumble and complain about having to lie and do propaganda, the World Health Organization and the CDC will move into Brazil and tell those Brazilian scientists to check out the 3,448 remaining cases of who-knows-what and say that most of them are microcephaly caused by the Zika virus. That’ll be the pressure point. That’ll be the op.

Because The Machine is in gear and moving, and health authorities can’t retract what they’ve already said. They can’t say: “Oops we made a mistake. We built a mountain where there is no mountain. Forget it. Zika is not a problem. And there are far, far fewer cases of microcephaly than we originally thought.”

They can’t do that and become the boy who cried wolf.


power outside the matrix


And if you think the Brazilian scientists who just blew the whistle on this whole operation by reporting their adjusted findings are now lying, because they’ve been pressured to cover up a wild out-of-control epidemic and protect certain culprits, that’s not how the game works. In that case, the Brazilian authorities would never have been allowed to announce widespread microcephaly and Zika in the first place.

Zika is a hoax. The World Health Organization and the CDC and government leaders are scrambling to get their stories straight. They’ll keep pushing the hoax, and vaccine makers will work toward a vaccine.

Based on nothing real.

Much of the time, that’s how all presumptive authority deals from the deck: they announce, they pronounce, they command, based on nothing real.

Jon Rappoport

The author of three explosive collections, THE MATRIX REVEALED, EXIT FROM THE MATRIX, and POWER OUTSIDE THE MATRIX, Jon was a candidate for a US Congressional seat in the 29th District of California. He maintains a consulting practice for private clients, the purpose of which is the expansion of personal creative power. Nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he has worked as an investigative reporter for 30 years, writing articles on politics, medicine, and health for CBS Healthwatch, LA Weekly, Spin Magazine, Stern, and other newspapers and magazines in the US and Europe. Jon has delivered lectures and seminars on global politics, health, logic, and creative power to audiences around the world. You can sign up for his free NoMoreFakeNews emails here or his free OutsideTheRealityMachine emails here.